Tuesday, 08 May 2012 21:44
Published in Travel & Training News

Carrauntoohil Challenge - Abbot reach the summit!

Hi Lorraine,

Just wanted to say thank you so much for your help in organising this. We had an amazing day. The weather was fantastic and we all made it to the top - still not quite sure how! Looking forward to the next one!

Report from Tony Nation, Lead Guide:

Saturday started off as a fine fresh day with little or no cloud to be seen as we headed to Kate Kearney’s to meet the 18 staff from Abbot, Cork.

The team started to arrive from 10:00 but not all arrived till 11:00 due to some confusion on directions from Cork to Kate’s.

Once all had gathered and safety briefing completed we headed in convoy to Lisleibane car park for the start of our climb.

Clouds had started to form on the hills and a cold wind had blown up. The trek in the valley to the stream was brisk and everyone was in good form. Just before the stream we headed right and began our climb up. As we made our way up we pointed out points of interest in the area as well as local place names.

The climb up was steady with plenty of opportunities for photographs. There was a biting cold at the top of Brother O’Shea’s but all were doing well. On reaching the top we were in snow for the last 100m this added a new element to the day. Everyone made it to the top in high spirits. After the photos were taken at the cross and lunch digested, it was time to make our way down, visibility was good from the top which added to the day.

On reaching the Devil’s ladder it was agreed that we would opt for the ZIGZAG’S. Due to erosion on the ladder, the zigzag’s is a better option. Everyone got back to the car park without issues. Then it was off to Kate’s for some well deserved food and refreshments.

Well done to all of the Abbot staff hope to see you on the hills again soon!

For all your outdoor team adventures contact us here at www.patfalvey.com

 

Friday, 27 April 2012 13:16

climbing carrauntoohil

With Kilimanjaro in their sights, two families arrived down to Kerry once again for more training on the 12th April as they prepare to travel on our June departure date. Following a briefing at the Mountain Lodge, we left for the Hags Glen joined by Wesley and Tom to climb Carrauntoohil. The day was bright and cool, with wintry clouds looming over the peaks around us from 7-800m upwards. We chatted about the upcoming trip to climb Kilimanjaro for the Quirke and Ronayne families, a mountain I had the pleasure to guide back in January. Training and getting gear sorted out were going well for them. With a sense of understanding about how to train achieved from our Meet Day, they are now focused on strengthening up the team and finalising gear selection.

Our walk in the valley was quiet because we started around midday. We got a taste of winter with a downpour of rain, not far off sleet as we left the main track at the ford and headed toward O'Sheas. Our gradual pull up the path with the 2 scrambles up steep ground proving adventurous for some of the group. After lunch the pace was slow and when we started to climb the bottom of O'Shea's Gully, we were reminded once more of winter with an intense shower of hard hail stone pounding our faces for ten minutes and then stopped.

photo of summit Carrauntoohil

Exhilarated, we put on an extra layer before heading toward the summit. There were a few others on top in cloudy grey cold conditions although dry. After a few photos and congratulations we left to descend toward the Devils Ladder. Half way down the cloud lifted and gave us brief views out to the sea in Kenmare bay. The decent was wet and took some care weaving a way through the loose gravel and rocks before we walked out the valley back to the cars.

Later the lads from Cork departed for home and the two families made for town to eat before getting up again at 2.30am for a night climb.

Starting from the top of the Gap at 3.30am, the head torches were bouncing around in a line as we started Purple Mountain. We adjusted our clothing with conditions being good and dry for now. We had 2 small breaks for water and snacks before we caught glimpses of the moon's reflections on the upper lakes of Killarney. As we crested the col nearing the summit, the light was approaching but only just. We wrapped up a little more and slowly got to the summit for 6.00am.

summit of purple mountain


The descent was easy at the start as you feel good following the summit but then tiredness that feels like you're on autopilot mode. That's when accidents and stumbles happen but luckily everyone was concentrating and we got back to the cars around 8.00am.

This fitness assessment course is ideal for setting a mark on physical and mental training required for trekking holidays and climbing Kilimanjaro. We recommend all groups to undergo this process and find out about gear selection along the way. Contact us to discuss options and dates for upcoming meet days and courses. The success rate is much better when you prepare well.

I wish the Quirke and Ronayne families the best, keep up the preparations.

Guide report: Niall Foley

Thursday, 12 April 2012 22:35

''Life is full of mountains to climb and obstacles that seem insurmountable at first sight. The best way to tackle these challenges is together!"


We are lucky to have Pat Falvey ready to take on Corrán Tuathail with us in order to raise funds for Suicide Awareness.


At 1039m/ 3414ft it’s Ireland's highest peak. This event is happening on 20 May and there are only 50 places available.


Our aim is for every person who partakes to raise €200 in sponsorship.


Contact us or see our events blog for more details.

Thursday, 12 April 2012 22:11
Published in Travel & Training News

''Life is full of mountains to climb and obstacles that seem insurmountable at first sight. The best way to tackle these challenges is together!"


We are lucky to have Pat Falvey ready to take on Corrán Tuathail with us in order to raise funds for Suicide Awareness.


At 1039m/ 3414ft it’s Ireland's highest peak. This event is happening on 20 May and there are only 50 places available.


Our aim is for every person who partakes to raise €200 in sponsorship.


Contact us or see our events blog for more details. 

Thursday, 13 October 2011 12:26

On Friday 23rd September, a group of colleagues/friends from Pepsico Carrigaline/Little island arrived down to Kate Kearney's to climb Carrauntoohil. Conditions were fair with some cloud about as we headed to Lisleibane, our start for the day. After a short briefing our pace was set by John heading us into the Hags Glen. Our group were mostly in I.T. department at Pepsico and were all well up for the climb.

The Route to the Summit of Carrauntoohil: We climbed up through one of the most beautiful routes on the mountain as we made our way through Coomcallee (The Hags Glen) before going off track passing Lough Gouragh (The Lake of the Goat) Breaking through the cliff barrier over the Step of the Goat, where we learned some scrambling techniques to gain the upper reaches of the mountain as we climbed through the three tiers of Coimin Iochtarach, Lair and Uachtarach (The lower, middle and upper valleys) to Ireland’s highest lake (The Eagles Nest).

We breaked for some lunch in very quiet and peaceful surroundings having some banter awaiting our next stage Brother O Shea’s Gully, a good pull up it is but only 30 mins or so did the trick. We ascended to the summit from the Beenkeragh ridge in breezy misty conditions. On top there was only about 6-8 others besides us and we all gathered elated for our summit photo.

On our decent the clouds lifted as we approached the Devils Ladder. It was still fairly breezy at this stage, we headed down into the shelter of the ladder slowly making our way left, right and mostly left again amongst the large boulders and loose scree which feels like moist gravel. The group were in flying form at this stage seeing the completion of their challenge only an hour or so down the valley realising they were nearly done!!

The track out the glen was still breezy with gusts nearly toppling us on the open ground as we viewed the route we took earlier described by John. Once back at the car, a decision was made to head for Kates, where we finished our day over a coffee/pint.

"Thanks soooo much for last Friday - we had a really great time - and everyone is still raving about it, was such a great experience" Rosie Coffey

Well done to all everyone on the day and especially Rosie for organising, hope to see ye again in the future, all the best!!

Guides: Niall Foley & John Healy

Report by Niall Foley

Thursday, 08 September 2011 15:39

We arrived to a busy Cronins Yard on Saturday morning at 10am. Having met Sinead, Louise and her dad Pat in Kate's car park earlier, introductions were already out of the way as we headed up the path into the Hags Glen. Weather was pleasing at that stage although it just started to drizzle, with cloud hanging on the top 200m of the surrounding reeks.

The Route to the Summit of Carrauntoohil: We climbed up through one of the most beautiful routes on the mountain as we made our way through Coomcallee (The Hags Glen) before going off track passing Lough Gouragh (The Lake of the Goat) Breaking through the cliff barrier over the Step of the Goat, where we learned some scrambling techniques to gain the upper reaches of the mountain as we climbed through the three tiers of Coimin Iochtarach, Lair and Uachtarach (The lower, middle and upper valleys) to Ireland’s highest lake (The Eagles Nest) Via Brother O Shea’s Gully, we ascended to the summit from the Beenkeragh ridge in breezy misty conditions.

On our way we met a medium sized group whom we spoke to as we asecended O'Shea's. On reaching the summit we celebrated with a few photos and started our decent. Views of the Black Valley, Kenmare Bay and the saddle at the top of the Devils Ladder finally opened up below us to compliment our already thoroughly enjoyable day. We went left to the Heavenly gates with not many others on the mountain with us at that stage nearing 4pm. Pat and the girls were taken aback when I showed them the rescue hut which has some beans inside if you were stuck!!

Our way out was nice and quiet leading us back to a nice cuppa in Cronins around 6pm. It was great to take our time and take in all the natural beauty which made the day. Best of luck to the girls next adventure, Pat was ecstatic about the day, it was all their first time up Carrauntoohil, Well Done!!

Report & Photos by Niall Foley

If you would like to climb Carrauntoohil please contact us in Kerry 064 6644181

Tuesday, 16 August 2011 17:23

 

Charity Climb in aid of Cystic Fibrosis Raises €10,200!

 

Pat Falvey presents a cheque for money raised on the Corran Tuathail climb with the support of Build 4 Life 4 Kids.  Over the years The Pat Falvey School of Mountaineering have been involved in walks in Kerry and around the world helping raise over €2,000,000 for different charities to raise money for worthwhile causes.

 

Commenting on this event Pat said " I am constantly amazed at the generosity that we as a nation have to help our charities to help others.  It gives us great pleasure to be involved in such events here and throughout the world."

 

www.patfalvey.com

 

 

 

 
Monday, 15 August 2011 14:21
Published in Travel & Training News

Kerry Mountain Rescue busy 14th August 2011. Corran Tuathail.

The Kerry Mountain Rescue Team were alerted after a 12 year old boy sustained a knee injury at the ‘first level’. The Team made their way to the scene and administered first aid to the casualty before stretchering him a short distance to a point from where he could be winched to the Shannon Coast Guard helicopter.

14th August 2011. Corran Tuathail. Assistance.

Whilst en route to the location of the previous callout, Team members encountered three walkers who were unsure of the correct descent route after abandoning their climb of the mountain. They were assisted over a rocky step and shown the correct route down.

The team do a great job. Well done.

Guides of Ireland's highest mountains:

If you wish to have a guiding services for climbing Ireland highest mountains why not contact us. For further information on web site or phone +353 (0) 64 6644181

We have catered for nearly 10,000 ascents to the summit of Ireland's highest mountain over 20 years.

 

www.patfalvey.com

 

 

Tuesday, 02 August 2011 00:33
Published in Travel & Training News

Rise In Rescues On The Reeks.

More and more people are taking to the hills and are ignoring the fundamental basic requirements that are necessary for safe journeys on Ireland's highest mountains, i.e. proper gear, navigational skills for leaders and bad route finding decisions.

Over the coming months we at the Pat Falvey School of Mountaineering will be giving free advice on our monthly newsletters on proper procedures on how to look after yourself and your team mates on the mountains.

Every year we see unnecessary accidents on mountains and we hope these educational pieces starting next month will help you to make your trekking, climbing and walking on the hills here at home in Ireland and abroad, much safer.

A very famous mountaineer coined a quote:

"Climb if you will, but remember that courage and strength are naught without prudence, and that momentary negligence may destroy the happiness of a lifetime. Do nothing in haste, look well to each step, and from the beginning think what may be the end". ~ Edward Whymper, first ascensionist of the Matterhorn, 1865.

Be prepared, plan your journeys and be logical with your chooses.

Kerry Mountain Rescue reported 4 rescues for July. While we at The Pat Falvey School of Mountaineering and Kerry Guides have had three contacts from different groups on the mountains for assistance en route, after finding walkers and climbers had been misplaced on the mountain and they required navigational help to get off the Reeks.

Lots of people are not taking the dangers of the Reeks into consideration and are ill-prepared for what is potentially a dangerous activity, on very tricky steep mountains.

Mountaineering is a dangerous sport/pastime. People must ultimately take responsibility for their own safety and due diligence is required from walkers, trekkers, leaders and guides.

No experience is no excuse to put yourself in danger.

People who have no experience should ensure that leaders they are going with have adequate experience before climbing into dangerous situations.

Also they should take responsibility for proper clothing, to have adequate boots and to ensure they have enough food and water for a hard days climb or walk on the hills..

Most accidents are caused due to lack of proper planning and the mistakes are simple.

If people are not experienced they should go with a leader/guide when they are outside their comfort zone. They should not go in groups unless the ratio of guide to inexperienced people on the team should only be 1:6 and over six leaders are required in the event of an accident.

Here at The Pat Falvey School of Mountaineering we provide Leaders - Guides- and courses in Kerry and throughout the world to assist those requiring our services. 

Contact us here at www.patfalvey.com for all your climbing needs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, 19 July 2011 17:57
Published in Travel & Training News

Alpine Training Techniques in Kerry

This week we ran one of our simulated Alpine Training Courses at The Pat Falvey School of Mountaineering at The Mountain Lodge.

Bad weather: Even though the weather was bad, the conditions were ideal to get all of the participants, who worked as a team, to complete their tasks that were set up 'under pressure' to work together and to show the importance of being knowledgable, swift and apt in the execution of the skills learned.   

Our team of skilled trainers have developed these courses to teach the skills required to participate in climbing in the Alps and further afield in the higher ranges.

The weekend courses include:

• Use of ice axe and crampons

• Techniques on glacier travel

• Crevasse Rescue techniques and simulated practice on cliff face.

• Rope work

• Knots

• Moving together on glaciers

• Clothing and equipment

 

Corran Tuathail:

The weekend also entailed climbing Corran Tuathail,  Ireland’s highest mountain at night and putting into practice all of the skills learnt in a simulated way.

 

MT. Blanc Group:

This weekend we had a charity group, who are preparing to climb Mount Blanc, go through their paces of pre-training before arriving in the Alps.  Congratulation to Teena Gates, Andrew Forde, Ronan Friel, Joseph Kearney, Jonathan Fitzpatrick on the completion of our Alpine Beginners Skills Course.

We also wish them the best on their task to raise money for Adi Roche's Chernobyl Children's International Fund who are now celebrating their 25th anniversary by climbing Mount Blanc in September.

 

Course objectives:

Theses courses are aimed to enable individuals and teams to make a successful safe ascent and descent of high altitude peaks around the world and they are ideal training for any group or individual wishing to brush up on techniques or for anyone interested in expanding their climbing skills to the higher, colder, snow-capped and icy mountains around the world.  For further information please contact our office or book one of our many courses. We also run specific courses to cater to the needs of teams and individuals and to the skills required for the objective in mind.

Ideal training for major expeditions and trekking climbs around the world.

 

 

For more information - please contact us here at www.patfalvey.com

 

 

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