Wednesday, 24 September 2014 11:59
Published in Travel & Training News

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We were delighted to have our top staff Pat Falvey and Freddy Tarimo to Lead The Girls Club Cork on their fundraising campaign to the top of Africa.

The Girls Club Cork is a voluntary Cancer Support Group for women, their families and friends, who have been directly or indirectly affected by cancer. Founded in 2011, the Club is located at 26 St. Paul's Avenue, Cork City, Co. Cork.

The Club is all about fun and a fighting spirit. In keeping with the fighting spirit a group of 12 brave warriors set off this morning from Cork airport to take on a huge challenge by conquering Kilimanjaro, the roof top of Africa. Not only will they be conquering the mountain but also conquering their own battles with cancer. The group is aiming to raise vital funds for The Girls Club so that we can continue to provide our support services including counselling, holistic therapies, a (free) wig & scarf bank to the women of Cork.

They reached the summit and sang their cancer beating song while waving their flag! It was a sight to behold , there were tears of joy and emotions flowing.

 

Walking and Trekking Guides & Tour Leaders

Pat Falvey is one of the worlds best expedition leaders, Pat Falvey has led adventures to some of the most remote regions of the world. With over 69 expeditons and 2 succesful summits of Mount Everest, you can be sure you are in the best of care.

Gerry Walsh is one of our senior tour leaders. He is a co-ordinator for those interested in pursuing walks and treks in other countries. Gerry also leads some of our international treks and safaris to Africa and Nepal. He has vast experience in Africa and has climbed Kilimanjaro over 10 times.

Tony Nation's love for nature and adventure has taken him to some amazing places such as Nepal, Africa, Russia and South America. Like many of our adventure guides and trainers, his passion is instilling local culture and traditions of the places we visit to those that join us on our many expeditions.

Fredrik Tarimo (Chief Trekking Guide) has travelled with Pat for nearly 20 years.

See also our Travel Team Page.

Information on Porters:

We at Irish and Worldwide Adventures ensure that all our staff and agents in every destination value and treat their employees, including porters, with respect and ensure their working rates and conditions are adhering to the local employment and Health and Safety guidelines. We have also built up excellent relationships with all of our operators to ensure the welfare of their guides and porters is a priority and expect the highest standards. For more guidelines and information on porters please contact us.


 Here is a sample daily Itinerary, on booking you will be issued a more detailed version as flights times may affect the overall Itinerary. Land only option is from: Arrive afternoon at hotel on Day 2*, Depart morning at hotel on Day 10*.

    *Day 1: Leave Ireland - Arrive Kilimanjaro Airport - Hotel B&B
    *Day 2: Rest & Briefing day - Hotel B&B*
    *Day 3: Start the trek to Machame camp (2980m)
    *Day 4: Shira Camp (3840m)
    *Day 5: Baranco Camp (3950m)
    *Day 6: Acclimatisation Trek Karanga Camp (4100)
    *Day 7: Barafu Camp (4550m)
    *Day 8: Summit (5895m) - descend down to Mweka camp (3100m)
    *Day 9: Mweka Camp to Base Hotel - Hotel B&B
    *Day 10: Departure for Ireland or transfer Safari with overnight - Hotel B&B (transfer 5 hour)*
    *Day 11: Game drive Lake Manyara proceed for Ngorongoro for dinner - Hotel B&B (Game 5 hour)
    *Day 12: Crater tour late noon drive to Arusha for overnight Safari hotel - (Crater 5 hour)
    *Day 13: Departure or Fly to Zanzibar; pick up transfer to Mtoni Marine Beach hotel for dinner overnight.
    *Day 14: Excursion in Zanzibar visit Stone town tour dinner overnight
    *Day 15: Leisure at the beach hotel - dinner overnight Mtoni Marine
    *Day 16: Departure for Ireland
    *Day 17: Arrive Ireland

 

September 8th:

Setting off from Cork airport for the adventure of a lifetime!


 

September 11th:

We set off this morning, all aboard the bus to the Machame Gate,our starting point in the rain forest at 1900 meters. Nerves from last night made way to excitement as the great mountain that is Kilimanjaro loomed in the distance, majestic and soaring above the cloud line.

At Machame Gate it was time to sign in with our leader Pat Falvey and Freddy our head guide. Once all the logistics were sorted we were off andwalked up through beautiful rainforest. Chat, songs and getting to know our fantastic guides and porters, always smiling and chilled like cool bananas.... hakuna matata... no worries!

Before too long, three hours had passed and it was time for lunch of samosas and other yummy snacks. Hit the spot! Then off again up to our first camp, climbing higher all the time and the temperature is starting to dip.

Rumours of strange noises from the bushes. its the wildlife from The People's Republic who  are the culprits... will say no more...haha!

We arrived just as darkness fell and were greeted by our 53 porters and guides to the Kilimanjaro song. It sent a shiver through our bodies. The best of welcomes.

We were then briefed on the use of our chemical toilet , the use of our tents and debriefing for the day. We were delighted when Pat and Freddy informed us we all did well.

Now we are sitting having the chat, the craic and supping on our hot drinks and snacking on popcorn before dinner arrives. Looking forward to Day 2, we will sleep well tonight!


 

September 11th:

Machame camp to Shira camp @ 3950 meters.

This morning started early when at 6:30am we were treated to hot teas and coffees in our tents, we could get used to this!  The chemical toilet aka "the powder room" is a big hit with everyone and given the 'windy' conditions some of the team are experiencing it's an even bigger hit with some more than others!!!

Speaking of windy, the weather has been anything but... pretty perfect so far (touch wood) with sun and generally clear skies.

The landscape changed as we hiked higher up the mountain changing from rainforest to beautiful moorland up above cloud level! The views are out if this world!

Altitude has started to make itself known to some of us in the group in different ways. Some mild headaches, low energy at times due to lower oxygen levels and that kind of thing but nothing too dramatic thankfully!

Six hours later we arrived at Shira camp and were greeted by our wonderful porters welcoming us to camp, Africa style, by singing and dancing with joyful abandon. This time we joined them in the dancing and spirits were well and truly lifted after a tiring hike acclimatizing.

Now here we are sitting in our mess tent stuffed after a wonderful meal and enjoying the craic as only the Irish know how. Kilimanjaro doesn't know what hit it haha!

We will sleep well tonight!

Until next time...

Team Kili for The Girls Club xxxx

 

September 12th:

Shira Camp to Barranco Camp.
An early start again today and the team are getting into the rhythm of trek life. The early morning light makes for stunning views every way you turn. We are feeling happy and blessed to be here. And by 8:30am we are off gradually making our way up the mountain trail. The weather again has been perfect. Someone is looking out for us!

Speaking of luck we are also happy to report we are acclimatizing well and today has been much easier in that regard. Barely any symptoms to report and those we are experiencing are mild at that. We are in luck.

The landscape changes as we trek through the day and we enter into another climate zone of moon-like terrain. Pole pole and one small step for man, one giant leap for cancer survivors! We are here to show people that life doesn't end upon cancer diagnosis and everyone can go after their dreams no matter how big or small.

Within a few hours we reach Lava Towers our acclimatization destination at 4600m. It is hot there and the sun strong so we are very glad of the shade in our mess tent for our lunch.

Then it is time to continue, downhill to our next campsite so we sleep low as is recommended for acclimatisation. By the time we reach Barranco we are tired but our porters are there to greet us again with their wonderful singing and dancing. We are happy to have arrived and despite the fatigue we are in great spirits.

Tomorrow we do the Barranco Wall and we are looking forward to it!

Until next time...

Team Kili for The Girls Club xxxx

 

September 13th:

The summit attempt tonight. Messages from the team to friends and family.

Grace: I just want to tell my family and boyfriend I'm doing very well and hope I'm doing ye proud. Think of us tonight as we attempt the summit love ye lots xx

Eimear O'Grady: Ciara Maber we are nearly there a few more hours and we will be heading for the summit, you're inspiring me all the way xxx

Noirin Doyle: Hey all having an amazing time here..summit tonight can't wait.. Lots of love xxxx

Karen: Hey guys all going well here one more big climb and and we'll hit the summit fingers crossed a belated happy birthday to dad xx, see ye all soon love Karen xxx

Sam: To all my family+friends+boyfriend David, doing well here! We summit tonight, keep me in your prayers! Want to make you all proud x

Dee Cullinane: Hi to all my family and friends, I'm doing really great and enjoying every moment, Africa is a beautiful country and tonight we attempt the summit, say a prayer for us! See ye all soon xox

Leone Levis: Ryan,Jess & Jack Keep looking out the window tonight I will wave from the top of Kili. miss u

Hi guys Ann and Mike here having a ball with amazing people Pat and the porters are so wonderful getting ready for summit we miss you all guys see u soon Ann and Mike xx

Laura: surprisingly still in one piece without falling, bring on summit! X

Eimear O'S: Hi to all the O'Sullivans, CCB and everyone else following me. Doing well and eating my spuds!!

Eilish O'Boyle: Hi to everyone from Barafu our base camp. Our Kili trek has been an amazing experience. I'm delighted to say I'm doing better than expected with the altitude. Summit night tonight and I will give it my all xxx



September 14th:

Barranco Camp to Karanga Camp 4:
This morning we awoke under the shadow of the imposing rock face that is the Barranco Wall, about 250 metres in height.

Standing facing the wall, we noticed small colorful dots moving at a sharp angle up the rock face.....these were fellow trekkers and porters!!! Wow this looks steep!

There were mixed feelings about The Wall.... from excited to very nervous especially those in the group not good with heights or used to rock scrambling. For many this would be a challenge but a challenge we all met in style with a fierceness of spirit that only challenges like Kilimanjaro bring to the fore. Is feidir linn.... We can do it!!!

And within a couple of hours we had made the ascent and celebrated in style with can cans, star jumps and.... chocolate!

And we walked on surrounded by dramatic scenery above the cloud line. Who would have thunk it! Here we are on the tallest free standing mountain in the world feeling like warriors!!!

And we trekked on, altitude being kind to us today! This climb is high, sleep low and the craic really is the business. Pat tells us we are doing exceptionally well in that regard. Good news and great for team morale.

Before long we see Karanga Camp in the distance. Not long now we think. Eh not quite.... a steep descent and steep climb and we have arrived! Woohoo!!! We are doing it people and can hardly believe it. Tomorrow night we do our summit attempt.... The time is fast approaching and we feel very positive. The Gods have been with us so far. Let's see what tomorrow brings.

Team Kili for The Girls Club xxx

 

September 15th:

Summit Night report on Kilimanjaro. By Eilish O'Boyle - Kili Blogger for The Girls Club

After just a few hours shut eye we were awoken at 10pm. Well awoken may be an exaggeration as I suspect, like me, it was more resting than sleep.

After a quick feed of biscuits, popcorn and hot drinks it was time for our summit attempt.

Within minutes we began the relentless slog uphill over rocks and zigzagging up sandy terrain underfoot. Darkness was probably to our benefit as at least this way we could not see how much further we had to go and just how steep the terrain was.

Under the watchful eye of a rising red moon we made progress.... slowly slowly. The temperature dropped dramatically as a bitter wind cut into our faces like icy daggers. It was beyond cold and within the first hour our two most of the team began to feel it. Our many layers were keeping us warm but just about. Freddie our head Sidar/Guide and Pat's right hand man in Africa told us the conditions were not normal and we believed him.

Ahead we could see caravans of lights from the head torches of other trekkers marking our path ahead.

Our breaks were short due to the dropping temperatures but vital for sustaining our energy levels. Our little snack pack of biscuits and other goodies kept us going. Our guides were always on hand to help us when it was needed.

And we walked on... doing the infamous Kili shuffle, one foot in front of the other.... and the mantra 'Is Feider Linn' on repeat in our minds.

Considering the extreme conditions we were doing remarkably well but Ann our intrepid leader, (Mama Kili, Mama Simba, Ledge (legend) to her friends and founder of The Girls Club) was unfortunately feeling the altitude more than anyone. With deteriorating weather conditions Pat Falvey Expedition Leader and Freddie made the tough decision and at 5,000 metres it was time for her to go back down for her own safety. Ann decided in the best interest of the team and for safety she would return, Ann had given it her all after just been told she was cancer free just 12 weeks previously, she had reached her Everest at 5000 meters. The team were gutted and continued on to bring her wishes to the summit. This is the reality of altitude. It does not discriminate and in this case she drew the short straw.

The sub zero conditions did not allow us much time with Ann and so we trekked on. Mind over matter we kept going. The sky changed from dark to deep orange as dawn progressed to sunrise.

Eventually we caught view of Stella Point and our spirits raised. We were at the first summit of Kilimanjaro and could hardly believe it!!! The relief and joy we felt along with a renewed determination.... we still had further to go and our adventure was not yet over.... Uhuru the true peak of Kilimanjaro was within reach and by God we were going to get there.

And within an hour or so we did!!! The infamous sign was within sight and together we got there. Emotions flowed... joy, relief, exhaustion and others we couldn't quite express.... we had done it.... together.... for The Girls Club, for our loved ones, for those we have loved and lost. This was a special moment and we would never forget it.

A special blog from each of the team to follow on their personal feelings of summit night to follow tomorrow.

Eilish O'Boyle - Kili Blogger for The Girls Club xxx



#kilimanjaro #canceraware Summit Night report on Kilimanjaro.  By Eilish O'Boyle - Kili Blogger for The Girls Club xxx  After just a few hours shut eye we were awoken at 10pm. Well awoken may be an exaggeration as I suspect like me it was more resting than sleep.  After a quick feed of biscuits, popcorn and hot drinks it was time for our summit attempt.  Within minutes we began the relentless slog uphill over rocks and zigzagging up sandy terrain underfoot. Darkness was probably to our benefit as at least this way we could not see how much further we had to go and just how steep the terrain was.  Under the watchful eye of a rising red moon we made progress.... slowly slowly. The temperature dropped  dramatically as a bitter wind cut into our faces like icy daggers. It was beyond cold and within the first hour our two most of the team began to feel it. Our many layers were keeping us warm but just about. Freddie our head Sidar/guide and Pats right hand man in Africa told us the conditions were not normal and we believed him.  Ahead we could see caravans of lights from the head torches of other Trekkers marking our path ahead.  Our breaks were short due to the dropping temperatures but vital for sustaining our energy levels. Our little snack pack of biscuits and other goodies kept us going. Our guides always on hand to help us when it was needed.  And we walked on... doing the infamous Kili shuffle, one foot in front of the other.... and the mantra 'Is Feider Linn' on repeat in our minds.  Considering the extreme conditions we were doing remarkably well but Ann our intrepid leader.... Mama Kili, Mama Simba, Ledge (legend) to her friends and founder of The Girls Club was unfortunately feeling the altitude more than anyone. With deteriorating weather conditions Pat Falvey  Expedition leader and Freddie made the tough decision and at 5,000 metres it was time for her to go back down for her own safety. Ann decided in the best interest of the team and for safety she would re turn, Ann had given it her all after just been told she was cancer free just 12 week previous she had reached her Everest at 5000 meters. The team were gutted and continued on to bring her wishes to the summit.  This is the reality of altitude. It does not discriminate and in this case she drew the short straw.  The sub zero conditions did not allow us much time with Ann and so we trekked on. Mind over matter we kept going. The sky changed from dark to deep orange as dawn  progressed to sunrise.  Eventually we caught view of Stella Point and our spirits raised.  We were at the first summit of Kilimanjaro and could hardly believe it!!! The relief and joy we felt along with a renewed determination.... we still had further to go and our adventure was not yet over.... Uhuru the true peak of Kilimanjaro was within reach and by God we were going to get there.  And within an hour or so we did!!! The infamous sign was within sight and together we got there. Emotions flowed...  joy, relief, exhaustion and others we couldn't quite express.... we had done it.... together.... for The Girls Club, for our loved ones, for those we have loved and lost. This was a special moment and we would never forget it.  A special blog from each of the team to follow on their personal feelings of summit night to follow tomorrow.  www.patfalvey.com Ireland's leading adventure company   Eilish O'Boyle - Kili Blogger for The Girls Club xxx

September 19th:

The Girls Club go wild! After an amazing success on Kilimanjaro, The Dream Team are taking time out to see the Big Five in Africa on Safari on day  one of our three day wild life safari. They will be visiting Ngorongoro Crater one of the most impressive conservation areas in the world. They will also visit the Tarangire and Lake Manyara National Parks, while also gaining an insight into the culture of the local tribes people. I'm delighted that they have taken time to investigate wild Africa before returning to Ireland. Best of luck girls and Mike.


 

Pat Falvey's photo.
 
 

 
Friday, 04 May 2012 09:43

One year on, Jerry O'Sullivan is doing well with his recovery from his incident on McKinley. On the 9th June a sponsored walk is taking place in the Gap of Dunloe. If you would like to help Jerry and his walking club raise money for his ongoing treatments and recovery please contact us on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by calling an organisers details below to receive an official sponsoship card. We hope to see you there.

Organisers: Lee Hillwalking & Mountaineering Club

Why?: Jerry lost his fingers from both hands and the toes of one foot after an accident on Mount McKinley, Alaska in May 2011

Where?: Gap of Dunloe - meet at Kate Kearney's Cottage at 9.30am

Walk: Up path toward Strickeen, over cnoc an Bhraca and Drishana to top of gap and back by road: 4-6hrs

When?: 9th June 2012 - walking begins at 10am

Donations can also be made to the following: AIB Bishopstown, AC No. 15064043, Sort code: 934321

For further information on sponsorship cards and details:

Lar Fant 0876823767 - Sean Casey 0872264446 - Con Collins 0872513922

Tuesday, 16 August 2011 17:23

 

Charity Climb in aid of Cystic Fibrosis Raises €10,200!

 

Pat Falvey presents a cheque for money raised on the Corran Tuathail climb with the support of Build 4 Life 4 Kids.  Over the years The Pat Falvey School of Mountaineering have been involved in walks in Kerry and around the world helping raise over €2,000,000 for different charities to raise money for worthwhile causes.

 

Commenting on this event Pat said " I am constantly amazed at the generosity that we as a nation have to help our charities to help others.  It gives us great pleasure to be involved in such events here and throughout the world."

 

www.patfalvey.com

 

 

 

 
Friday, 22 July 2011 15:22
Published in Corporate News

kerryway

Huge turn out for Cancer Research Walking Weekend in Kenmare. This is the fourth year that we have been involved in the Cancer Research Walk which has seen a huge increase in numbers over the years for this popular event. The walking is suitable for beginners that just want to get up, get out and get fit.

Strong support has raised €400,000 to date: Today Pat Falvey and Pat Spillane set off over with 220 people on a the three day Kerry Way Challenge and Trek to raise money For Cancer Research. The projected target for this years fundraiser is hoped to top over €100,000, bringing the total over the four years to reach over the €400,000 mark.

 

 

The Gods are with the Walkers: On The Kerry Way this year, it seems as if the gods of nature are with the walkers as the forecast predicts three fine days ahead. The Kerry Way is one of the most scenic and beautiful areas in the country and the walk brings us across magnificent scenery of both landscape and seascape around the Kenmare region. The weekend blends walking and social activities that covers over 100km of both the Iveragh and Beara Peninsula, as well as good food and accommodation in Kenmare with good music and mighty craic. A lot of the trekkers have made an annual event of this challenge and have developed amazing friendships through the cancer research challenge.

 

Once again, Pat Falvey was delighted to be involved and commented that “There is not one family in the country that has not been effected by this disease.  Funds raised at this event go, to what has been recognised, as one of the leading research centres in the world, helping to develop cutting edge science in the treatment of cancer and I am honoured to be associated in this event.”

 

We just like to wish all trekkers a wonderful weekend and to say well done to all the staff volunteers and guides on what will once again go down as a wonderful weekend in Kerry.

 

www.patfalvey.com

 

 

Information on the Cancer Research Project: The Cork Cancer Research Centre (CCRC) is a multidisciplinary organisation that investigates major issues that concern the genesis, progression or treatment of cancer. Its purpose is to provide discovery and innovations that may be applied to the prevention of the cancer in the first place or to the development of more effective treatment strategies. Its foundation was based on the unshakeable belief that the cancer questions can be resolved and that we could create the capability to make significant contributions.

kerrywaySince its inception in 1999, Cork Cancer Research Centre has been a leading force in developing new treatments for cancer patients that provide tangible benefits to those most in need of breakthroughs. Current research at the Centre is solving the critical challenge of secondary cancer and is directed at three research themes: Cell Death and Survival Mechanisms, Novel Therapeutics and related Devices and Gene Therapy. Cork Cancer Research Centre has also developed significant programmes in Prevention and Education.

The progress and success at the Centre has been through the scientific and personal initiatives that the CCRC has established with groups throughout the world. Vital to our success has been the core structure upon which multidisciplinary programmes are built. This approach ensures that we take the latest findings from clinical practice to the laboratory to focus our research. We then bring the latest research breakthroughs to the clinicians to apply our findings. The research work carried out at the Centre has already translated into five unique clinical studies.

From our modest beginnings with only two employees, the Centre has rapidly expanded in both size and significance, while never forgetting the central tenet of our task: To advance new cancer treatments through research. This continues to be our mission.

CCRC staff are located in laboratories and offices at the Mercy University Hospital and the Leslie C. Quick Jr. Laboratory, Biosciences Institute, UCC. Funds for the Centre are generated through research grants, voluntary fundraising efforts and private donations.

"Advancing New Treatments Through Research"

Registered Charity No: CHY 11831

For more information please contact Helena Slattery, Development Officer for Cork Cancer Research Centre on 021 4901437 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 
Friday, 01 July 2011 14:39
Published in Awards & Appearances

 

Press Release - Pat Falvey & Pat Spillane Unite to Walk The Kerry Way for Cancer Research.


World renowned adventurer Pat Falvey and legendary Kerry footballer and sports pundit Pat Spillane, put county rivalries aside to launch the Kerry Way Cancer Research Walk 2011 in aid of Cork Cancer Research Centre. Both men will take to the Kerry Way to lead over 250 walkers out during the 3 day hill walk which will take place on July 22nd, 23rd & 24th.

"Cancer affects so many people, through their own journey or through someone they know. Taking on cancer is a daunting challenge which requires focus and determination, elements which are also needed for facing other challenges in life such as climbing Mount Everest or walking to the North or South Pole. However the greatest challenges cannot be achieved alone - it is the team supporting you that will help you get through. Just like the team of people that I work with to achieve what most would say as impossible, the Cork Cancer Research Centre provides focus and determination to the challenge of bringing new treatments to cancer patients. I'm delighted to be involved in this event and to lend my name and support as part of the fundraising efforts for cancer research, and to help combat cancer." commented adventurer Pat Falvey.

"There are still too many people, family and friends who are affected by cancer. The research this walk supports is the kind of cutting edge research that will change that. Having heard about the work of the Cork Cancer Research Centre, I am delighted to join these trails and raise vital funds for their work". "The Kerry Way provides a spectacular setting for this fun event and the three routes for 2011 are both stunning and challenging. I'm looking forward to it." said legendary Kerry footballer, Pat Spillane.

 

kerry way cancer research walk launch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Online registration is now open on the event website www.kerrywaycancerwalk.ie. All details regarding The Kerry Way Cancer Research Walk launch can be accessed on this user friendly site, which provides plenty of information and guidance regarding the walk routes, fundraising, accommodation, training, etc. Participants can walk one, two or all three days. Alternatively walkers can call the Development Office directly on 021 490 1437.

The Kerry Way Cancer Research Walk is a 71km three day fundraising event that has gone from strength to strength raising nearly €400,000 for cancer research in the past four years. The 2010 event was a tremendous success with over 250 walkers, from every county in Ireland, braving all types of weather to make a positive impact on cancer and raise an astounding €75,000. The event goal this year is to raise €100,000 for cancer research.

The three days of guided walks will start and finish each day in Kenmare and will incorporate impressive mountain views, dramatic peaks and glens, wild moorlands, wooded paths and lakes along the Kerry Way trails. Challenging but fun, the great camaraderie on the route adds to the spectacular settings and ensures a truly memorable experience!

The routes over the three days:

  • Friday July 22nd Sneem to Kenmare 28km
  • Saturday July 23rd Lauragh to Kenmare 26km
  • Sunday July 25th Killarney to Kenmare 17km

Past supporters of The Kerry Way Cancer Research Walk include Sean Kelly, DáithíÓ Sé, John McHenry, and Kevin Kehily.

Photographs include: World renowned adventurer Pat Falvey and legendary Kerry footballer and sports pundit Pat Spillane, Bláithín Kiernan and Patrick Murray, both walk leaders and members of the Kerry Way Cancer Research Walk organising committee.

Photographer: MACMONAGLE PHOTOGRAPHY, Killarney

Ends

 

Editors Notes:

The Cork Cancer Research Centre (CCRC) is a multidisciplinary organisation that investigates major issues that concern the genesis, progression or treatment of cancer. Its purpose is to provide discovery and innovations that may be applied to the prevention of the cancer in the first place or to the development of more effective treatment strategies. It's foundation was based on the unshakeable belief that the cancer questions can be resolved and that we could create the capability to make significant contributions.

Since its inception in 1999, Cork Cancer Research Centre has been a leading force in developing new treatments for cancer patients that provide tangible benefits to those most in need of breakthroughs. Current research at the Centre is solving the critical challenge of secondary cancer and is directed at three research themes: Cell Death and Survival Mechanisms, Novel Therapeutics and related Devices and Gene Therapy. Cork Cancer Research Centre has also developed significant programmes in prevention and education.

The progress and success at the Centre has been through the scientific and personal initiatives that the CCRC has established with groups throughout the world. Vital to our success has been the core structure upon which multidisciplinary programmes are built. This approach ensures that we take the latest findings from clinical practice to the laboratory to focus our research. We then bring the latest research breakthroughs to the clinicians to apply our findings. The research work carried out at the Centre has already translated into five unique clinical studies.

From our modest beginnings with only two employees, the Centre has rapidly expanded in both size and significance, while never forgetting the central tenet of our task: To advance new cancer treatments through research. This continues to be our mission.

CCRC staff are located in laboratories and offices at the Mercy University Hospital and the Leslie C. Quick Jr. Laboratory, Biosciences Institute, UCC.

Funds for the Centre are generated through research grants, voluntary fundraising efforts and private donations.

"Advancing New Treatments Through Research"

Registered Charity No: CHY 11831

For more information please contact Helena Slattery, Development Officer for Cork Cancer Research Centre on 021 4901437 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or contact us here at the office - www.patfalvey.com

 

Friday, 10 June 2011 16:51

 

Pat,
Great credit to yourself, Gene and the organisers for undertaking the responsibility of bringing a large group of novice climbers like me up Ireland's highest mountain. For so long I have wanted to do this and was greatful for the opportunity and being able to raise money for Buil4life made it worthwhile.

Kind regards, Peter Browne & Neil Browne (the last two on the bus)

 

This charity climb of Irelands highest mountain Carrantuohill took place on Saturday 11th June. We facilitated this worthy cause on the day.

 

Build4Life Kids Charity Climb Carrauntoohil

 

 

Meeting place Kate Kearneys Cottage in the Gap of Dunloe at 08:30- 09:00 for briefing before departure for the starting point at Cronins Yard.

All climbers were advised to ensure that they bring warm clothing, good boots and raingear as it will be cold with heavy showers during the day.

Build4lifekids/CysticFibrosis need to raise 1.5 million to build a dedicated clinic and isolated rooms for the kids of CF in Munster. It is the only charity fnding these facilities. Joe Brown from Castleisland and co founder of Build4LifeKids said " the children of Cork and beyond are currently being treated in sub-standard conditions which directly effects their chances to remain healthy longer.

Over the last 4 years Build4LifeKids have risen over 2.3 million euros to develop facilities for adults with CF attending Cork University Hospital (CUH)

For further information please call 087 2317722 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Friday, 20 May 2011 00:48
Published in Travel & Training News

Join us as we climb Corran Tuathail, Ireland's highest peak (1039m/3414ft) on May 29th 2011 in aid of suicide aware, the Cork based organisation set up to help deal with the issues of depression and suicide in Ireland. The climb will be led by charity patron Pat Falvey and his team of experienced guides.

Meeting Point: Kate Kearney's Cottage, Gap of Dunloe

Meet Time: 10.00am

Sponsorship cards available from Pat Behan 087 9454202 (Minimum sponsorship €150pp)

This is the third annual climb with Pat and it has proven a most popular event. It will be on a first booked basis as numbers limited to 80 pax for safety reasons.

Many of the last years climbers are interested in making this a weekend event and the local hostel is providing special rates for all interested - pre booking is essential.

Basic walking skills required and walking gear essential - Look forward to meeting you on the day! For more information or to book a place contact us or www.suicideaware.ie

Suicide Aware climbers on Carrauntoohil

Friday, 08 April 2011 20:01

Being involved in fundraising with the charity, we will be watching tonight as Adi Roche, Ali Hewson & Liz O Donnell, Chernobyl Children International appear with Ryan Tubridy tonight, Friday 08th April (21:30 RTE 1) to launch the charity's commemoration events planned for the 25th Anniversary of the disaster.

Ryan will speak to his special guests about the work of CCI, the fall-out from the world’s worst nuclear disaster and the impact of the tragedy on children and families in the Chernobyl regions who continue to suffer today.

Twenty five years later, the crisis has not gone away and now, more than ever, we want to assure the people of the region that they have not been forgotten. Tune in tomorrow night to show your support!

www.patfalvey.com

 

 

Tuesday, 22 February 2011 16:10
Published in Travel & Training News

Ian Delahunty successfully summitted Mount Kilimanjaro as part of our January 2011 trekking team. Everyone's journey was a wonderful achievement and for Ian, added to the joyous emotion of reaching summit was the fact that he did so in the name of Cork based charity Suicide Aware

 

His reasons for becoming involved in fundraising to increase the charity's profile are those of the personal experience of losing his father and it is with great motivation that Ian runs and gets involved in many fundraising events that continue now more than ever with future plans that may led to further worldwide adventures. We are delighted to be working with Ian in making these trips a reality and as always, in working with association to Suicide Aware. To book your place as part of our teams Contact Us now! www.patfalvey.com

 

FUNDRAISING ACTIVITIES 2011
Trekking in Memphis ''Trekking the Southern States" "The Cradel of the Civil War"
In the cradle of the "Old Man River", the mighty Mississippi. From Nashville, Tennessee to Cleveland, Grand Ole Opry, Ohio and New Orleans. Louisiana to Graceland and Sun Studios in Memphis, Tennessee. Trekking for Ireland's most worthy charity-Suicide Aware. Join Mick Mulcahy for 9 Days of trekking and sightseeing and help us save lives. Contact Pat at Suicide Aware Date: September 2011 087 9454202.

 

 

We are honoured that Munster Rugby has selected Suicide Aware as one of their three nominated charities for 2010-2011, as part of their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Plan. Munster Rugby are donating a €1 from every ticket sold for the match, including season tickets, and will be running collections and fundraising activities on the day. All money raised will be split equally between, Suicide Aware, TLC4CF and UNICEF Munster Rugby are asking our supporters, sponsors and suppliers to join us and donate through the following link http://www.mycharity.ie www.munsterrugby.ie

Corrán Tuathail Climb 2011 ''This is the 3rd annual climb with Pat Falvey and as it has proved to be a most popular event. It will be on a first booked basis, as numbers must be restricted to 80 for safety reasons. Many of last years climbers are interested in making it a weekend event and the local Hostel is providing special rates for all interested so prebooking is essential. Looking forward to meeting you all on the day'' Date: Sun 29th May 2011 Meeting Point: Kate Kearney’s Cottage 10am Sponsorship Cards available from Pat at Suicide Aware 087 9454202 Minimum Sponsorship €150.00 per person. Basic walking skills required and normal hill walking gear is essential. 



Kilimanjaro Climb with Pat Falvey Date: Jun 25th 2011

 

Departing Ex-Cork or Dublin,this 10 Day trek will be a challenge to be remembered

 

For your Kilimanjaro Trekking Pack Click here

 

'Your adventure of a lifetime can help to save a life of another'

 

For further information, Contact Us or call Pat at Suicide Aware 087 9454202 Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

www.patfalvey.com

 

 

Wednesday, 06 October 2010 12:10

Everest Base Camp & Island Peak Success for The HOPE Team

Check out the reports from their successful ascent!

Day 18: Pat's quick Report Oct 18th - We are now in Lukla and missed our flight today due to bad weather, fingers crossed for tomorrow. We are all wrecked but that is sometimes the way it goes to achieve your goals. Thanks to everyone following back home, some rest and a nice big meal in Kathmandu tomorrow is worth waiting for..

Day 16 to 17 - The team are now on their decent passing through Namche then down the steep sided gorge of the mighty Dudh Kosi river toward Lukla where they overnight prior to an early morning return to Kathmandu. Confimed report due in soon.

Day 14 - Teena Gates' Island Peak Report Oct 14th - "I did it. Today I clawed and dragged my way to the Summit of Island Peak. A technical climb for a greenhorn who'd only been trekking for the past 6 months and who'd never before had a set of crampons on her feet. Team Hope spent 10.5 hours on the mountain and not all of us made it. But I did, and I can't believe my body allowed me to do that. Hours of walking up a bouldered ridge, hours more dragging our way across a glacier, then the agonising climb up a sheer head-wall of ice. 2/3rds of the way up, with my legs screaming, the harness cutting into my groin and my crampons refusing to get traction on the ice, I remember looking up to see how far I had to go. I knew at that moment with absolute certainty that I would get there, but with equal certainty I had no idea how! I remembered a comment from team leader Pat Falvey that getting to the top was '80% in the mind.' I dug in and lashed out with my ice-pick and dragged myself up with my arms, slowly, screamingly, growling at myself and going again until finally I reached the top. Scaling my way up the final ridge walk and abseiling three ropes down a mountain seemed incidental after that. I was snow blind (temporarily), the harness had cut my groin and my face was badly burned from the exposure and the sun at the height we'd reached. Sore, stunned and weary; but 'on top of the world'.... "

Day 14 - Pat's blog - Back at Island Peak Base Camp ''We are all back at Island Peak Base Camp! 7 of the Hope Team and 3 Sherpas summitted..we have just had dinner. Everyone's in good form and tommorrow, we commence our descend to Kathmandu.''

Day 13 - Teena's Blog - High Camp Island Peak I'm back. Today Team Hope practiced fixed rope technique at Island Peak Base Camp and then trekked up to High Camp; a tough 2.5 hr hike across steep and rough terrain. When we reached high camp, we broke for soup and then began an acclimatisation hike up towards the ridge that would begin the technical climb for Island Peak. An hour into the climb and about a third of the way up, the Team called halt and prepared to turn around and go back down to make camp for the night. Before we moved off, we had an impromptu briefing on the cliffside as expedition boss Pat Falvey asked us whether we were capable of making it to the top of the ridge tomorrow. He stressed that we'd need the strength to accomplish that and THEN climb a mountain, and pointed out that any late turn-arounds would rob the team of Sherpas and guides and add to the risk. From somewhere within I felt a quiet confidence descend and heard myself saying with certainty that I could do it. Folks, I'm back......

Day 13 - Pat's Blog - Island Peak High Camp Oct 13th (1400 irish time) "Weather is good and holding, first summit attempt by all Island Peak team members in 6 hrs approx., Everybody is a little tired but all looking forward to the climb."

Day 12 - Teena's Blog - Base Camp Island Peak -  I'm out! Today we trekked our way to Base Camp Island Peak.....and I bailed. The hike was tough but I walked well into Base Camp, the tents were set, we drank soup in the mess and I was game for the challenge ahead. Shortly afterwards Team Hope headed for an acclimatisation walk to Island Peak High Camp. We walked along a gully and turned towards the mountain to begin to climb. I stared up at the dark, grainy boulders reaching into the sky, & strained my neck to search for the outline of the summit against the cold, blue, bright evening sky. Catching the eye of expedition leader Pat Falvey, I slowly drew my finger across my throat, turned on my heel and headed back down the mountain....alone.

Day 12 - Pat's Blog - Island Peak Base Camp Oct 12th ''Its Tues..it's after 7.30pm (14.52 Irish time).. We are all at Island Peak Base Camp moving to High Camp tommorrow...making attempt the following morning in the early hours. All the team are in good form''

Day 11 - Teena's Blog - Chekkung to Lobuche:  We've made Everest Base Camp and climbed Kallapatah and now the final & biggest test is looming. Today I got my first real sight of Island Peak. Jesus! Realisation hit for the first time of what I'm crazy enough to be considering. Christ. It's a bloody mountain. I mean a craggy, icy, jagged, real life mountain, at 20,300 feet - higher than Everest Base Camp and a technical climb needing harness and crampons and ice-picks. What am I doing? Who am I kidding? I stared in disbelief at the summit and ridge off in the distance, as the team traversed the countryside between Chuckung and Laboshe. With the challenge to Island Peak looming, Team Hope gathered in the evening for a technical briefing from expedition leader Pat Falvey. Our challenge was now switching from trekking to technical. Looking around I could see for the first time that my fellow colleagues were also feeling doubtful and tired. We have reached two of our three key objectives and are now wondering about moving to the next level. A haunting, moving, soul-searching day...

Day 10 - Pat's Blog - Base Camp & Beyond  - Pat rang to report the teams sucess in reaching Base Camp and climbing to summit of Kala Patthar (Meaning 'black rock' in Nepali, Kala Patthar appears as a big brown bump below the impressive south face of Pumori (7,161 m/23,494 ft). At the wind-swept summit ridge, after a five to ten minute scramble over boulders, the top is marked with prayer flags and the views from here of Everest, Lhotse and Nuptse are spectacular.)

 

 

everest shot from gorak

With emotion in his voice, Pat spoke of the journey so far, the teams' determination and positive attitudes to challenges they have had to face. The weather has changed becoming overcast and Pat talks of the cold air surrounding him as he calls - standing outside the tea house, the teams' home for another night before they leave in the morning for Island Peak Base Camp. Pat has turned three of the team around today- a decision made in consultation with the team. While Vivian, David F & David W. now commence descent, their contribution to the team and their own personal successes is a credit to the three of them and the attributes they have given to the team will be carried forward in the team's attempt on Island Peak.

Day 10 - Teena's Blog - Kala Patthar -  Today we climbed Kallapatah mountain at 5,550 metres, the same height as high base camp for Island Peak. The climb is part of our acclimatization, but it's also a challenge in it's own right. We left at 4.30am to catch the sunrise on the way up. It was bitterly cold and this was also something we needed to experience. Off we set across a sand flat, double-gloved, in thermals and balaclavas, & within minutes, my drinking water had frozen in it's insulated platypus or carry-pouch. The drag up was excruciating. I was overheating with exertion although my fingers were stinging with the cold, & altitude was robbing me of oxygen, making every breath a gasp for air. I kept moving onward and upwards, remembering the life-mantra I'd been preaching for the past 10 months of training 'one foot in front of the other'. Finally the sun burst over the surrounding snowy peaks and hit the team as it struggled upwards. Gloves and down jackets abandoned we made it to the top, after two & a half hours' of climbing. We exchanged greetings with several other climbers arriving from around the globe, took pictures and picnicked on Snickers! In the middle of the celebrations my eye took me further, to a stony spur jutting up from the summit. To my surprise I found myself edging up there, ignoring the plummeting drop on either side. Well, I'd come so far......it seemed a waste not to! Don't know what happened to my dread of heights, maybe it's the altitude. Happy in my world above the world, I noticed one of our Sherpas had spotted me and captured my moment on camera. I've got to get that snap.

Day 9 – Teena's blog - Base Camp Oct 9th,  I’ve made it, I’ve done it. I’ve climbed to Everest Base Camp. A gruelling, emotional odyssey that has transported me from 23 stone to the ‘me’ of the moment that has achieved the impossible. Ten months ago I promised to do this, but I never really thought I could, although I never really admitted I couldn’t. I’ve lost 11 stone to get here and I’m 44 years of age. If I can do this, you can do anything. Today I commented to a colleague on reaching Base Camp that we had reached a platform of dreams. Dreams for those that climb higher than Everest, and dreams for those that go down to lives touched with the knowledge that the impossible is possible. My next challenge is Kala Patthar Mountain at 5am, in preparation for making the Summit of Island Peak. I’m not sure I can make it, but I’ll give it a go. Whatever the result tomorrow, I’m bringing my dreams home…
Listen to Teenas podcast in our Podcast Gallery here.

basecamp_resize

Day 8 – Teena's Blog - Lobuche - Our ‘rest day’ in Pheriche started with an acclimatising walk which took up five hours in the morning – followed by a couple of hours of fixed rope work in full gear, with ice-picks and crampons on the hills behind us, as night began to fall. Practicing the arrest techniques we’ll need to stop us falling at full speed off an ice wall, I smacked my face off a rock. My teeth are still intact, but packing at 6am to trek uphill to Labouche, I was happy to leave our ‘rest day’ behind! Lobuche brought its own surprises- no Internet, no phone signal and the now familiar stench from the ‘drop loos’ masked only by suffocating kerosene fumes that forced tears from our eyes. My ‘roomy’ Vic and I fell back on copious quantities of our one luxury, a tub of Chanel No. 5 bought in duty free on the way out.The combined essence was probably even more toxic, but we slept blissfully in denial, even if early morning brought puffy eyes and wheezing chests... Day 9 and Everest Base Camp beckons....

Listen to Teenas podcast in our Podcast Gallery here

Day 7 – Teena's Blog - Pheriche Oct 7th - I found the warrior within. Today was a day for acclimatising, pushing up to 16,000 feet behind Pherica for tea, before returning back to base for a 2nd night. I thought it would be easy, that this was a ‘rest’ day because we weren’t moving on to a new destination. Wrong! It was a brutal, long, hard haul. It should have taken two hours to get to the teahouse, but we made it in 3, which failed to impress our expedition leader, now sometimes affectionately known as ‘Grand Master Falve’.
The breakout for me was on the return; after falling behind, I suddenly kicked into another gear and ran 300 metres up two hills to catch up. It was pure fury that fired me up and it felt amazing to romp home. They have an expression here, a greeting that you make on the trek, Namaste – “I greet the God within”. I doubt if I host a God, but today I found my warrior…

Day 6 Teena's Blog - Pheriche  - Today I hit a wall…but I climbed over it… After yesterday’s adventures, I struggled to keep up with Team Hope, as I limped my way up a mountain. It was another tough ascent, raising up 1,500 feet for over 5 hours. The terrain was rough and each leap from boulder to boulder jarred my injured foot. There was no other option but to keep on walking and I gritted my teeth and got on with it. I admit I felt sorry for myself, I even felt a couple of tears well up at times. The team is fabulous though, with lots of hugs on tap, and the scenery helped to distract me. The turning point was when we all burst into song, winding our way through the mountains like the Von Trapps and bursting into giggles whenever we met groups of climbers on the way down.
Maybe it’s the altitude, but we’ve got to be the happiest group of trekkers out here and we’ve painted smiles on strangers’ faces from here to Shangrila… Team Hope’s Birthday boy David Walshe later commented that we’d sent smiles around the World. Celebrating Dave’s birthday with pizza later that night, at nearly 13,000 feet, life again felt good.

 

Above Pheriche

Day 6 - Pat's Blog - Pheriche All arrived well at Pheriche where the team will start to move above the flora and into tundra. More tomorrow.

Day 5 – Teena's Blog - Deboche  - Today I kneeled in a cold temple for two hours and tried to meditate. It was a hard day’s climbing through hot sun, from Namche to Deboche. The whole team did well though, as we cranked up the acclimatization another notch. Under the shadow of Everest we passed through an ancient gateway to the town that hosts the local monastery. We spent several hours listening to the monks’ ceremonial chanting and were blessed for the journey ahead. Without exception, we all found it a moving experience. I jogged down the pathway afterwards feeling special… invincible. Then my foot slipped, and my ankle turned. It hurt – disaster! I hopped to a nearby mountain stream, kicked off my boot and plunged my foot in. It was dark, and the light from my head torch drew a circle around my foot and the icy river. As the rest of the group sought shelter in a nearby teahouse, the sound of silence descended. Within moments I was picking up new sounds, rustles and creaks in the darkness beyond. My memory turned to the joking jibes at dinner the night before about snakes and poison spiders. I stood the terrors and the cold for a few minutes more, before bolting for the teahouse with a tiger on my tail.  Tomorrow’s walk is tough, but I’ll deal with that tomorrow. Tonight, I’m safe and warm and that will do for now.

Day 5 - Pat's Blog- Tengboche & Deboche - This morning we trekked with fantastic views towards our next stop Tengboche. We decended to the valley floor and rose through the forest to Tengboche and the well known Buddhist monastery there. Jenny has some issues with her knee but is moving along ok. We arrived at 3pm and received a special blessing (PUJA) from over 60 monks, emotional for all of the team. We decended later in darkness to arrive in Deboche at 6.30pm. A good aul sing along was had by the whole team. Along the way we had stunning view of the mighty Everest behind Lhotse-Nuptse wall. In Deboche start to circle under Ama Dablam as it towers over us. Tomorrow we start for Pheriche.

everest trek lhotse wall_niall

Day 4 - Teena's Blog - AMA Dablam - If you left Dublin today and flew in to join me, you would probably die. I'm at 12,000 feet & you can't breath here unless you've had a chance to acclimatize. Today is a rest day which means we only walked for a couple of hours and gained a thousand feet. After lunch, we turn around and head right back down to Namche. It's a chance for us to prepare our heart and lungs for the next push tomorrow, when we've got another tough day's climbing.

Today we had a special treat. At 12,000 feet we stopped for lunch at a Nepalese Hotel and Extreme Artist Philip Graye gave us an art lesson. We hope to paint at Base Camp and auction the canvases for the Hope Foundation. Today we each used pastels to create a picture of the beautiful iconic mountain, AMA Dablam. It marks the gateway to Everest; and yes, today we saw those snow capped peaks for the very first time....

Listen to Teena's podcast in our Podcast Gallery here

 

ama dablam

Day 3 - Teena's Blog - Namche Bazaar Today was tough. I climbed 3,000 feet and it hurt. But it was extraordinary and I loved it. We woke at 6am at Phakding and breakfasted on fried potatoes and eggs in the shadow of the mountain. A snow-capped peak burned pink and golden as the sun rose. It isn't Everest, we won't glimpse her until tomorrow, but it's stunning, and a reminder of the icy treks ahead. Here at 8,000 feet, it's hot and we're walking through lush green after the recent monsoons, though temperatures plunge as soon as the sun sets. Our trek today took us past beautiful rivers and waterfalls, with rainbows shimmering in the spray. We crossed narrow suspension bridges moving dramatically with the span and our 14 strong team trooping across. I found them scary and I met them far too frequently for comfort. It was a tough climb today, 8 hours and 3,000 feet. Altitude kicked in a little. I had a small nosebleed and felt lightheaded if I moved too fast; but getting a rhythm helped and walking into Namche Bazaar felt great, if somewhat tempered by the knowledge that we were staying in a tea lodge far beyond the town. Uphill of course!

Listen to Teenas podcast in our Podcast Gallery here

Day 2 - Teena's Blog - Lukla Today I flew into a mountain.. From Kathmandu, Pat hired a small twin engined propeller plane and flew into Lukla, a village hanging off a Nepalese mountain, and the next step on our journey to Mount Everest. The tiny runway is buried in the mountain and the arrival has to be the scariest air approach in the world. The plane's engines took an almost animal like pitch as she turned in towards the cliff, and after watching the pilot bless himself....so did I. Brakes and reverse thrusters kicked almost the moment the wheels touched down and within moments we were out and standing on a mountain. A quiet crowd of Lukla locals gathered around us, with hardly a murmer, their quiet presence a marked contrast from the wall of noise we'd met when getting off our international flight in Kathmandu the day before.


We walked to a nearby teahouse for lunch & already some of us were feeling the affects of the altitude. We had flown in at 9,000 ft, almost three times the height of Carrauntoohil, Ireland's highest mountain. Shortly afterwards, we put our day packs on our backs and started walking - downhill. Our destination is Phakding, a thousand feet below. The plan is to 'walk high and sleep low' to help adjust to altitude. It means walking to a certain height, then coming back down a little, before re-tracing our steps the next day. As the days of walking and climbing accumulate, I just know that's going to be annoying! Onwards and upwards....

Listen to Teenas podcast in our Podcast Gallery here

 

Kathmandu

 

Day 1 - Pat's Blog - Kathmandu Start of the Expedition - 1st Oct 2010  - No matter how many times I go to Nepal, I get excited at the thought of returning to my spiritual home. A place that has changed my life, having gone there in 1991 on an expedition to climb a beautiful mountain known as AMA Dablam with a group of good friends. I went first, as the cliche goes, to 'find myself', only to lose myself and return to civilisation a new person.
A lifetime later, I have been here 25 times and I have never lost the joy of returning to this amazing country. It's sights, sounds, smells and the hustle and bustle of a vibrant community of people. To once again experience their culture as I lead a group of Irish adventurers on an exciting journey to explore what is for them, their Everest. For me another return to my most favourite place on planet earth.

Mixing adventure with a spiritual odyssey and to meet old friends that I have made over the years, with a group of enthusiastic volunteers who are helping to make life better for the street children of Calcutta by raising money to enhance their life through education.

The Team
Jenny Kavanagh: Actress From Ireland's leading soap tv series Fair City, Jenny has taken on the extra challenge of achieving her Everest after traveling to Calcutta to witness at first hand, the abuse and terrible conditions experienced by street children there. She has exchanged her high heel shoes, make up and long polished nails for climbing boots, sun block and getting her fingers dirty to take time out from her busy schedule to complete a challenge and raise money for the Hope Foundation.


Rob Ross: TV and Radio Presenter Rob has been presenting on the very popular RTE TV childrens' program 'Ice' for over six years. With his youthful looks, vibrant personality and abundance of energy, Rob's hunger for a new challenge has brought him to this point of climbing to base camp Everest and beyond to Island Peak, to help the children living in the slums of Calcutta. A native of Athlone, he's clocked up many miles travelling to the mountains of Kerry to train for this amazing challenge.


George McMahon: Actor Everybody's favourite as Mondo in Fair City, George has been passing on his gifts to a new generation of aspiring actors with his thriving stage school, whilst also in production for a cameo role in the new TV series, Camelot. George has strong family ties to Killarney and Carrauntoohil where he ended up training for the Everest challenge, but he had never stood foot on a mountain, until inspired to reach new heights after travelling to Calcutta, to visit the Hope Foundation projects earlier this year.


Teena Gates, Head of News 98FM 12 months ago she had her own Everest to climb when she weighed 23 stone. To achieve her goal of getting to Everest Base Camp and hopefully beyond, she has lost over 11 stone; having made amazing sacrifices to get a chance to achieve for her, another milestone in her life to walk in the footsteps of her heroes.


Philip Gray: Extreme Artist Incredibly talented extreme artist Philip Gray has been a tireless supporter of the Hope Foundation, attending its Dublin Ball this March, where he masterminded an interactive experience which fascinated guests who watched him create a work of art before their eyes which was later auctioned for the charity. Philip travels extensively to the worlds' most extreme environments to create the most dramatic paintings imaginable, which feature in more than a hundred top galleries across Europe. Having visited Everest before, he knew the challenge that lay ahead when he was asked to return and push beyond Base Camp to Island Peak. He had no hesitation in accepting the challenge and joining Team Hope.


Support Team: Rosaleen Thomas (Hope), Vivian Harrison (Hope), Edward O'Donnell, David Walshe, Hugh Chaloner, David Forrester.
My return to Kathmandu has already added to the unique gathering of memories of past adventures and explorations in this beautiful part of the world. I'm delighted to be back here with one of the best teams any group could wish for; while being reunited with some of my Sherpa team who I've been operating with over the past 25 years. Ang Rita, Sumba, Pemba, Niama, tsring and Kami all who will be helping and supporting the HOPE team. I'm also supported by some of my own team from home here in Kathmandu -Tony Nation and Mark Orr. Let the journey begin! In the morning one of the most interesting flights in the world as we leave Kathmandu to the beginning of our trek to Everest Base Camp and Island Peak.

Facts on Nepal

Population of Nepal 29 million
Population of Kathmandu 1 million
Mortality: when I went first it was 39 now has risen to 62

Pat Falvey, Adventurer

Interested in Trekking in Nepal? Maybe Africa? See our Worldwide Travel section for choices! 

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