Monday, 02 August 2010 15:10

On behalf of Suicide Aware, our very sincere thanks to all who took part in our annual climb with Pat. Despite the weather conditions, everyone completed the climb and the atmosphere was never dampened by the rain. The current economic climate did not discourage anyone and fundraising from the day continues to roll in. Very sincere thanks to everyone for their endeavours on our behalf.

This year it was most encouraging to have so many of last years climbers come back again, and of course, climbers from outside of Munster and we are delighted to have the Dublin support on board. The suggestion for a 2 day event for 2011 is most encouraging and we will explore the same in January 2011. It makes great sense especially for those staying overnight and we can make arrangements with the local youth hostel, who are most co-operative and sympathetic to our cause.

As a voluntary organisation, all our funds this year go towards training courses and the support of professional help for anyone in crisis.

Once again our most sincere thanks to all those who participated in our second climb- we anticipate that this climb will become the highlight of our Events Calendar each year.

Sincerely, Pat Behan ( Suicide Aware)

www.patfalvey.com

 

Tuesday, 20 July 2010 16:27

 

 

Everyone today had a fantastic day out on the mountain even through is rained all day and everyone was soaked to the skin. We took advantage of the bad weather and decided to make our way up through cascading gullies that were in full flow. We zig zagged our way over rocky outcrops, climbing up a nice chimney called the step of Carrauntoohil which brought us from the Lower coom to the middle coom on the Mountain before entering the classic Curve Gully. This is mainly use as a winter route in snow and ice grade 1/2. Before breaking out above Irelands highest lake in Coimin Uachtar into Brother O Shea's Gullys before breaking onto the Beenkeragh Ridge and onto the Summit. Today was wet, windy and exciting for all of the team out today.

see some of our pictures by click here.

For a feel for the events of the day click on our audio interview below.

 

 

Contact us today at www.patfalvey.com for all your climbing needs. 

Wednesday, 14 July 2010 22:46

The ForEver Young Club:


Derrick Kroll celebrating his 77th Birthday by climbing Irelands Highest Mountain in stormy conditions, Relaxing with his wife Mary, they are also celebrating 54 years of bliss together.
Enjoying a few pints, music and song in Kate Kearney's Cottage after an exciting day for both.

Guide Gerry Walsh

www.patfalvey.com

Listen to the wisdom from Derrick on Audio Boo click .

 

www.patfalvey.com

 

Friday, 09 July 2010 15:07
Published in Tours & Attractions

Beara 002

  • Overview

  • Route

  • Grade

  • Prices

  • Itinerary

  • Gear

Trip: Beara Peninsula Walk & De-stress Week


Altitude: 670mt/2,200ft

 

Route: See Itinerary for Daily Routes


Date: All Year 


Duration: 7-8 hours with 4-5 hours of daily walking


Grade: Walking - Easy/Moderate

 

Our Walking De-Stress Break will give you an adventurous walking week amongst some of Irelands most dramatic sea and landscape with the opportunity to learn a little about our monastic settlements as well as opening our interest to Tibetan Buddhism and the art of meditation as a form of relaxation.
Relax, enjoy get fit and de-stress from the hustle and bustle of modern life and join in on our de-stress walking holidays. Good company, food, accommodation and craic galore!

 

You can choose a 2 day, 6 day or an 8 day itinerary that best suits you and your needs from our listings.

 

Killarney and its surroundings are some of the most idyllic and ideal wilderness for the keen walker. In this land where mountain, wood, and water harmoniously blend you can learn something of the spectacular ecology and scenery to which this area is justifiably famous for. We combine an exciting itinerary that will blend walking, good food, culture and craic that will have you returning to the hustle and bustle of life feeling relaxed and refreshed.

Walking: Easy/ Moderate

Contact one of our office team to discuss dates and itineray that suits you 

 

Price includes:


• Ferries and cable car to Islands
• Boat journey through the Lakes of Killarney
• Transportation to/from walks
• B&B in top quality Irish homes and hotels (3* and 4* standard)
• Dinner in some of Ireland's best restaurants, including such famous restaurants as The Lime Tree, Mulcathy’s, Nickies and Kates Kearney’s Cottage.

 

Minimum of 6 people per trip.

Day 1: Friday evening: We meet in Killarney in the evening to depart for our accommodation.

 

Day 2: Saturday:

Trip: Boat Journey through the Lakes of Killarney


Route: O’Sullivan’s Cascade in oldest oak forest in the country - Lord Brandon’s cottage at the head of the upper lake - through the Black Valley and into the Gap of Dunloe, a glaciated rugged valley formed after the last ice age - Kate Kearney’s Cottage.


Duration: 7 Hours (3-4 hours walking)


Grade: Easy

 

 

Day 3: Sunday:


Trip: The Old Kenmare Road


Route: Today we make our way to Kenmare along the Old Kenmare Road. Our journey today will take us across the wild countryside between Killarney and Kenmare on an easy ramble. This excursion will take us on a meandering jaunt along the rugged track that was once the old road to Kenmare.


Duration: 8 hours (4-5 hours walking)


Grade: Easy/Moderate

 

 

Day 4: Monday:


Trip: Sceilig Rock


Route: We tour around the Ring of Kerry to Portmagee where we leave on a boat journey for an incredible hike on the famous monastic ruin on the Sceilig Rock. This is subject to weather conditions. An alternative walk will be done if the sea conditions are too tough for this trip.


Duration: 8 hours (1.30 hours walking) (Rock) or 4 hours walking in Winter


Grade: Easy (with choice of scramble to Hermits Cave)

 

 

Day 5: Tuesday:

 

Trip: Beara Pennisula


Route: Our journey to our objective today will take us on a trip along the scenic coastline of the Beara Peninsula. We will walk in the beautiful rugged valley of Glanrastel and climb the picturesque hill known as Knockowen (Cnoc Eoghain) 2,200 feet in height. Our descent route will take us along a meandering broad ridge that divides the borders of Cork and Kerry, the views are spectacular with Bantry Bay to the South and Kenmare Bay to the north as we walk westward to our destination at the Healy Pass. A low level walk on the Beara Way can be arranged as an alternative.


Duration: 6 hours (4 hours walking)


Grade: Easy/ Moderate

 

Day 6: Wednesday:


Trip: Tibetan Buddhist Retreat Centre & Dursey Spur


Route: Beara Peninsula - Dursey Spur


Duration: 8 hours (2 hours introduction to relaxation, meditation & an insight to Tibetan culture; 3-5 hours walking)


Grade: Easy/Moderate


In our visit to the Retreat Centre, we partake in a meditation and relaxation session. The center is situated on the wild and beautiful Beara Peninsula. It sits high up on cliffs overlooking the Atlantic Ocean with breathtaking views of sea and sky. We will get a chance to explore the Truths of Tibetan Buddhism and learn techniques of relaxation that we can use in daily life. After a visit to the Buddhist center we will take an exciting walk on the Dursey Spur taking time out to reflect on our experience amongst the great beauty of wild open spaces, rugged cliff faces, spectacular seascape and experience the beauty and tranquility of island life on Dursey. Note: Island walk depending on cable car times at Castletownbere.

 

Day 7: Thursday:


Trip: Beara Island


Route: Beara Peninsula- Allihies to Eyeries through the copper mines


Duration: 8 hours (4 hours walking)


Grade: Moderate


We spend a further day walking on Beara. Depending on weather conditions, we will explore the beauty of yet another magnificent island, Beara Island. Our option for the day is a walk through the copper mines across one of the most picturesque walks in Ireland.

 

Day 8: Friday:


Departure for home. Special note: Due to the nature of Irish weather our walking holidays will have a number of options that we can alter depending on conditions. If we are going to an island we will be able to alter our walking days to pick the best time to take advantage of sea conditions. We will also be able to alter high level walks to coastal walks depending on conditions on the hills.


Walking boots, warm layering system, wind/rain proof jacket and pants, warm hat and gloves, small day bag to carry rain gear. If you are going on hike for more than 4 hours, we recommend that you carrya packed lunch and plenty of water.

First Aid Kit: I’d suggest bringing a small personal first aid kit.

Thursday, 01 July 2010 14:57
Published in Travel & Training Team

Pat's extraordinary life includes more than it's fair share of triumphs and disasters, both as a businessman and adventurer. There were many highs, but there were low points, too. His stories of survival against the odds in business and his adventure life inspire tens of thousands of people every year.

Pat Speaking

As a businessman…
Pat weathered booms and busts, and over his life as an entrepreneur, he experienced the hunger for success, the yearning for more, the disappointment of failures, and the satisfaction of achievement. For his success, Pat also suffered great costs personally and to his family in a rags to riches story that finally led to a contented, balanced life.

 

 

 

Pat the Adventurer

As a world-renowned adventurer…
Pat has lead multi-lingual, multi-cultural teams into the highest, coldest, harshest, most remote and beautiful places on planet earth. Places where even a small mistake in planning, communication or teamwork and decision-making may cost the ultimate price: DEATH.

 

 

As a concerned citizen of the world…
He has seen firsthand a changing planet. These changes hold frightening consequences for us as humans: the effects of global warming, climate change, population explosion and the destruction of ethnic cultures by colonizing forces.

Pat’s life has been a rollercoaster: colourful, unique and definitely varied right from the start.




From an early beginning...
Old days  street selling

At only seven years of age, Pat’s mentor and grandmother Mary B. O’Callaghan set him up in his first business. Mary purchased a babys pram for Pat to collect second hand clothes for her to sell. Pat then turned his pram to further good use by collecting turf (a fire fuel) from a nearby coal merchant, and selling kindling from his fathers building yard to old age pensioners. At the age of ten Pat was the wealthiest kid in his area and had a thriving business.

 

 

A hunger for success...
With a hunger for success and business, Pat left school at just 15 years old “to become a millionaire.” His occupation began as a bricklayer. With enthusiastic zest, and with mentoring from his father, Pat had 20 people working for him in a construction company by 17 years old. At the age of 18, he became a property developer in a rising market, and within a year was building over 200 houses a year.

Pat at Housing ShowFrom here Pat followed his dreams and goals with focus, determination, passion and belief. By the age of 21 Pat had achieved his objective: he was a millionaire.  Life and business were moving fast. Success after success led to him becoming one of Ireland’s leading young business entrepreneurs. Then, when Pat was 29, Ireland entered a severe recession.  Pat took his eye off the ball, over traded, and cash flow dried up. The banks, who had given an umbrella while the business climate was fine, took it back while it rained. Pat lost everything and went broke. This period of life was traumatic for Pat and for a short period he lost his self-confidence, self esteem, and in turn got depressed. But with belief from family, friends and the business community he bounced back with even greater vigor.  The lessons Pat learned would help lead to future success in business, and in an unforeseen and exciting new career.  From a state of depression and total loss of self-esteem, new ideas took form. Bouncing back at the age of 29, he launched a finance company, rebuilt his construction and property development firm and at 40 retired from the construction and property market to lead a life of a different kind.

 

A new beginning...
Pat climbing on EverestTo relieve the stress of his dire circumstances, Pat took up hill walking and fell in love with the challenges it presented him. On only his second climb – reaching the summit of Ireland’s highest peak Corran Tuathail – he was so stimulated that he turned to a friend and (with a glint in his eye) declared he was going to climb Mt Everest. Of course everyone thought he was crazy and just a dreamer. He would prove his critics wrong.   He took the disciplines learned from his business career and adapted the skills required to succeed in his new career. He trained hard and learned all the techniques required, not only to be an efficient and competent mountaineer and adventurer but also to become a world-class expedition leader. He honed his skill by climbing with people that had a similar passion for self-sufficiency in the wilds. He perfected his technical skills in being a member of the Kerry Mountain Rescue Team for 9 years, and became involved in a number of spectacular rescues.

A journey of adventure...
A new course began to unfold that would take him from the depths of depression to rebuilding his self esteem and confidence, leading to a lifetime of adventure all around the world. With renewed determination and focus he rebuilt this new business, and went on to complete over 65 thrilling and exciting adventures around the world, crossing glaciers, mountains, deserts and jungles to make his dreams a reality. As an expedition team member and leader Pat has climbed on Mt Everest four times, reaching the summit twice, crossed Antarctica to the South Pole, traversed Greenland over shifting ice flows, as well as completing many more life-changing expeditions. He also became the first person in the world to have twice reached the highest peak on each of the seven continents, including Mt Everest from both Nepal and Tibet.



The exploration of man...
png

Pat also lived with and studied over 20 tribes of people worldwide, from western man, to nomadic tribes in Africa, to the stone-age tribes in the jungles of West Papua New Guinea. From them, he has discovered fascinating similarities and traits in all of mankind: to challenge, to change, set goals, and to achieve. Among these various tribes and cultures he has studied what exactly has driven man to succeed since the evolution of our species.

 

 

The future...
Never one to rest on his laurels, Pat has since formed many exciting new businesses and adventures that keep him busy and stimulate his keen interest and passion for people, places, and wildlife.

Corporate Services...

Pat speaks to Wyeth in Mansion House

Pat is Ireland’s leading motivational, inspiration and business speaker and CEO of Pat Falvey Life Long Learning Development Courses and training modules for the corporate world. He is a business consultant in team development and in achieving maximum results.

Taking all the experiences of his lifetime in business, extreme adventure, travel and leadership, Pat has created a no-nonsense formula for success. He and his team of corporate trainers have developed a range of presentations and courses that encourage people and companies to realize their full potential.

 

Adventure Tourism...

Adventure Holidays for all ages

Pat is CEO of Ireland’s premiere adventure company, Irish and Worldwide Adventures. With his team of dedicated staff, they offer expeditions, treks, and skills courses as well as walking, wildlife, holistic, de-stress and fitness tourism holidays and activities in Ireland and around the world.


Golden Circle Adventure Club...
Pat is the founding member of the Golden Circle Club, which specializes in adventure for those of mature age. Believing that life really begins after fifty, Pat and his team have developed specialized adventures in travel, fitness tourism, education and wildlife. These activities cater for all fitness levels for age groups over 50 – from beginner to those that are more experienced travelers or adventurers.

Pat Falvey TV and Film Productions...

Pat Filming in Papua new GuineaHaving spent a lifetime in business, adventure and exploration in the most beautiful, remote, awe  inspiring places on planet earth and with a variety of different tribal cultures, as a natural extension of his knowledge of these wild places, Pat has developed media partnerships to bring the magic and adventure of these experiences to the general public.

 

 

Filming in kathmandu

 

 

He now works with partners in Ireland, Washington DC and South Africa as a producer and presenter, as well as a safety and location logistics consultant to develop and produce educational, environmental and adventure documentaries and videos. See also Works in progress at the bottom of this article.

 

Four part TV Series, Beyond Endurance...
A story about ordinary people setting themselves a target that most would say was impossible. The program follows their journey as they prepare, train, and endure some of the harshest conditions known to man. They retrace the journey that Ernest Shackleton made across South Georgia to save his men stranded on Elephant Island in the Antarctic.

The controversial ad for participants read “Ordinary men and women wanted for extraordinary expedition; we train you may die.” Seven thousand people applied and 32 where chosen to make this adventure the biggest group ever to undertake this task.

The message was clear: with a good team, belief, passion and leadership we are all extraordinary given the right circumstances. Nothing is impossible given the right conditions. Through sheer determination, positive attitude, self-belief and passion for life. Pat has conquered negativities and the fear of failure by always having a go for it attitude and has achieved his ambitions in all he has set his mind to. Go to our Gallery to see this series.



Education...
Adventure Based Learning for Youth
Pat founded the Beyond Endurance Adventure Based Learning Experience (BE ABLE) under his Corporate Social Responsibility Charter, which uses exploration of the outdoors to create awareness of global issues, climate change, population explosion their affects. He also hopes to encourage active citizenship in young people, and in particular to nurture an understanding and interest in science and technology.


Education for children, Freddy T. Bear
Freddy T BearPat, with friends Dr. Clare O’Leary and Mary Curtin set about developing the character Freddy T. Bear.  Freddy has a loyal following of over 220,000 children as he chronicles his adventures on expeditions around the world.  This adventure bear is an innovative approach to teaching children (and adults) the geography of the world. Through Freddy’s adventures and discoveries, as relayed in his journal, e-mails, photographs and video coverage, children can learn about the cultures and traditions of the countries he visits. His travels have taken him to many countries around the world, including Nepal, Tibet, Peru, Argentina, Chile, America, Antarctica, Canada, Norway and Europe. He has completed the 7 Summits Challenge and many other adventures alongside his mentors Pat Falvey and Clare O’Leary. Freddy is also an educational initiative by Pat, Clare and Mary to teach children to have dreams, goals and aspirations and not to be afraid of failure.  Freddy is 7 bear years old, lives with Pat in Kerry, and has written a number of books with Dr. Clare and Pat.

European Adult Education Project...

In September 2009, Pat and his team successfully established a research partnership with eight universities and research institutions across Europe, funded by the EU Lifelong Learning Program and are coordinating the two year EU-funded Grundtvig Programme Project.

The purpose of the project is to build a consortium of experts that will share their knowledge and expertise about informal adult learning in various EU countries. The emphasis of the project will be making various subjects available to the public (adults) through informal learning contexts such as long-distance courses, internet courses, environmental parks, natural history museums, science centres, galleries, nature trails and others.

Corporate Social Responsibility Program...
Under Pat’s awareness program he has been heavily involved in numerous charity projects and has helped raise over €750,000 in Ireland over the years. He is also patron to the Suicide Aware Charity in Ireland as a mentor to help others see that in life there is always hope.

Awards...
Pat and his teams have also been presented with many awards and accolades for their contribution to the environment, education and human endurance including:

Polar Medal; presented by Mary Crean O'Brien the daughter of Ireland’s unsung Polar hero Tom Crean. In honour of being the First Irish team to trek to the South Pole.

Cork Person of the Year 2008; Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year - Nominee for Special Category Social Entrepreneur.

Presidential Honours; On three occasions, Pat and his teams have been honoured by the President of Ireland for leadership, endurance and national pride for their unique achievements.

Civic Awards; There have been numerous other civic awards for Pat and the teams he leads on expeditions around the world, in recognition of his leadership and the successes of their achievements.

Radio Awards; National PPI Radio Awards “Ask The Explorer” won a bronze award in the category of Specialist Speech Programme. Explorer and Adventurer, Pat Falvey answered questions put to him by presenter Deirdre Walsh and by school children from all over Kerry - about the expedition which he successfully led on foot to the South Pole. Pat stated, “I am delighted that in a small way I can contribute to education through this form of program, and I’d like to thank those at Radio Kerry for the initiative of running with this idea of “Ask The Explorer”, which gave children an insight into Antarctica, its history and wildlife in an exciting format.”

Inspired Information Technology Awards; Pat and his team won the Green IT project of the year 2008 at the Inspired Awards for their innovative approach to education and the environment during the Antarctic Voyage of Discovery. Pat’s Beyond Endurance Education Program received an award under the Green IT Project of the Year for their TYACT project which links science, technology and active citizenship in Transition Year students by bringing them on an inspirational Voyage of Discovery to Antarctica. Students worked as research assistants with scientists on a three-week journey in Antarctica. These awards have now been established as the focal point in Irish information communication technology calendar, highlighting the achievement of IT executives and their teams in Ireland.
IT Awards were created by iReach to recognise heads of IT and their teams for their strategic role in helping to drive competitiveness, and place Ireland at the forefront of knowledge creation and IT innovation globally. In 2008 iReach recognised 12 category winners across the Irish marketplace representing all types of companies: government departments, SMEs, global multi-nationals and leading indigenous companies.

Books & TV...
Reach for the Sky - Biography

A Journey to Adventure - Stories I never thought I'd tell
A photo journal full of the stories and images of Pat’s explorations. See our shop for more details

Works in progress:
Upcoming motivational and self help book:
We all have mountains to climb. The Psychology of Success, Finally meeting years of popular demand, this is a book that conveys Pat’s formula for success in people lives. "We all have an Everest no matter who we are and we all have the ability to make it a reality.” To be completed in May 2010.

The Three Poles Expedition - Documentary
Currently in progress. An adventurous, moving, motivational story with breathtaking imagery that will follow Pat and his team’s journey into the harshest, most remote and dangerous places on earth. The North Pole in the Arctic, The South Pole in Antarctica and the “third pole”, Mt. Everest. These journeys are man’s greatest physical and mental challenges and the book deals with the psychology, planning, leadership, team, training, history, and that the drive that challenges us as humans to achieve such goals. To be completed December 2010. Go to our Gallery to see more.

Pat Falvey has lived an amazing life by following his philosophy, which is:

"Believe in yourself, have dreams and goals, be positive, don’t quit, and change with changing circumstances. Go for what you want with all of your capacity, strength and tenacity. I believe if you have these attributes your dreams and goals will in life become a reality. My mentors have taught me this from a early age and I have succeeded in making all my dreams come true.” Pat Falvey. 

 

www.patfalvey.com

 

Thursday, 01 July 2010 09:20
Published in Skills Training

Navigation Weekends

  • Overview

  • Details

  • Dates

  • Prices

  • Grade

  • Itinerary

  • Testimonials

Course: Navigation & Rope Skills Weekend


Altitude: 832m/2730f approx


Route: Weather dependent


Date: TBD - Contact us

 

Duration: 2 days - 18hrs


Grade: Easy to Moderate


Price: €150per person - Residential options available

Fed up of walking on the beaten track? Want to explore off the trail? Try our Navigation and Rope Skills Course.

 

Instructors at the Pat Falvey School of Mountaineering have developed a weekend course to provide you with the skills required to be confident and self-sufficient in navigating on the hills and mountains here in Ireland. Along with these skills, you will be introduced to certain Rope Techniques such as coiling, belaying, confidence roping, knots and abseiling.

 

Over this two day course you will learn all the basic skills you need to navigate here at home. This course is set for those who wish to increase their skill level and would like to feel confident that they can enjoy the hills and mountains and return safely.

 

Saturday:

  • Map Reading

  • Feature Recognition

  • Grid Referencing

  • Basic Compass Skills

  • Clothing and Equipment

  • Practical Application


Sunday:

  • Review of Day 1

  • Route Planning

  • Compass Skills

  • Movement on Steep Ground

  • Group Control

  • Rope Skills

 

We at the The Pat Falvey School of Mountaineering encourage and train in all aspects of the great outdoors to allow walkers, climbers and expedition members to become self reliant, whether it is on your local hills or on extreme adventure expeditions around the world. Contact us for further training courses!

 Be Safe, be Self-Reliant and Enjoy the Great Outdoors

Next Date: Contact us

 

**Trainers can travel throughout Ireland to provide course to groups or clubs.**

Price: €150 per person - excluding accomodation.

 

**Accomodation can be arranged on request.**

Practical:

 

Saturday: Moderate - 5-6 hours

 

Sunday: Moderate - 5-6 hours


Saturday:

 

  • 08:00 - 08:30: Meet & greet briefing and gear check

  • 08:30 - 10:30: Map reading and navigation

  • 10:30 - 10:45: Break

  • 10:45 - 11:00: Transfer to hills/mountains

  • 11:00 - 16:00: Practical application on hills (including lunch) with further on-site training

  • 16:00 - 16:30: Return to base

  • 16:30 - 17:30: De-briefing

****


Sunday:

 

  • 09:00 - 09:15: Meet & Greet and Gear Check

  • 09:15 - 09:45: Review of Day 1

  • 09:45 - 10:30: Introduction to Rope Skills & Equipment

  • 10:30 - 10:45: Break

  • 10:45 - 11:00: Transfer to Hills/ Mountains

  • 11:00 - 16:00: Navigate to Rock Climb & Introduction to Rope Skills

  • 16:00 - 16:30: Final De-Briefing

 

" For me personally, there is no point in climbing the Alps or the Himalayas, if you can't competently navigate around the mountains at home!!  So this is a course I had wanted to undertake for some time.  It completely exceeded my expectations in the amount of ground that was covered over the weekend, was extremely comprehensive and went over and beyond what you expect from a typical navigation skills weekend."

Suzanne Stroker


 

Tuesday, 29 June 2010 00:00
Published in Testimonials

OSI Resized

 

"Ordnance Survey Ireland employed the services of Pat Falvey as an inspirational speaker at our launch of the Discovery Series maps at the Aviva Stadium on Thursday, 24th June 2010. Pat addressed an audience of over 200 guests from the corporate, tourist and outdoor activity sectors. Pat spoke with great passion, energy and enthusiasm. We received very positive feedback from our guests including a general theme that they went away with a “real good feel” factor. I am very happy to recommend Pat as an inspiring and entertaining speaker."

Geraldine Ruane, Chief Executive, Ordnance Survey Ireland.

Tuesday, 29 June 2010 14:45
Published in Tours & Attractions

Dingle Peninsula

  • Overview

  • Details

  • Grade

  • Prices

  • Itinerary

  • Gear

Trip: Dingle Peninsula Walk & De-stress Week


Altitude: 520m/ 1695ft


Route: See Itinerary for Daily Routes


Date: All Year Round  


Duration: 7-8 hours with 4-5 hours of daily walking


Grade: Walking - Moderate


Price: Contact us for details 

 

Join Pat Falvey on a Walking De-Stress Break which will give you an adventurous trip into the land of blue-gold hills and sandy beaches, of glorious waterfalls, hidden bays, wondrous rock formations, caves, arches, busy harbors and wayside pubs. A land dappled with heather, primroses, bluebells, foxgloves, fuchsia, and smiling faces to welcome you. This peninsula that inspired films like "Ryan's Daughter" and "Far and Away" has much to offer people in search of something different.

You can choose a 2 day, 6 day or 8 day itinerary that best suits you and your needs from our itinerary.

Spend time in a place rich in tradition, literature and culture, where native Gaelic prospers alongside modern languages, where the perfect harmony created by nature restores the spirit. Where you can relax and savor the scenery, the flora and fauna, the art, the crafts, the culture, the archaeology, the wine and food, or just meet the people – the choice is yours!


Bain blaise as dhraíocht leithinis Chorca Dhuibhne, áit a bhfuil áilleacht chreagach, sléibhte maorga, tránna geala gainmheach, easanna aoibhinn, bánna ceilte, cuanta gnóthach agus tithe tábhairne beoga. Tá abhar iontach anseo ar leithinis Chorca Dhuibhne (áit a bhí mar ionspioráid ar scannáin cáiliúla ar nós "Ryan's Daughter" agus "Far & Away", dóibh siúd ag lorg eagsúlacht saoire den scoth.
Ní áilleacht tíre amháin atá i gceist anseo ach éagsúlacht beatha agus saibhreas oidhreachta, cultúrtha agus teanga – teanga a labhartar go forleathan i measc an phobail mar gnáththeanga laethúil. Tá cáil idirnáisiúnta bainte amach ag leithinis Chorca Dhuibhne de bharr a cultúr, a saibhreas ceardaíochta agus ealaíne agus de bharr feabhas agus blastacht a cuid bia agus fíona. Tig leat aoibhneas a bhaint as áilleacht saibhir an dúthaigh agus an dúlra, áit é seo threamhrach an t-suaimhnis. Is leatsa an rogha!

Walking: Easy/Moderate
Inclusions:

• Ferries to islands
• Transportation to/from walks
• B&B in top quality Irish homes and hotels (3* & 4* standard)
• Dinners in some of Irelands best restaurants, including such famous restaurants as The Half Door & Doyle’s.

Minimum of 6 people per trip.

We meet in Killarney on the evening before Day 1 (Thursday)


Day 1 Friday:

Trip: Connor Pass/Dingle (Habitat: Mountain /Heath)
Route: Dingle town- Old Butter Road to top of Connor Pass. From here, there are some of the most spectacular views of Dingle harbor, spread out below to the west and down to the dunes and beaches of The Maharees to the North. From here we climb up along the Connor Pass Ridge, descending back to Dingle.


Day 2 Saturday:

Trip: Mount Eagle (Habitat/Coastal Mountain)
Route: Dingle- Ventry- Mount Eagle- Slea Head- Coumeenole Beach- Ventry. The western most extremity of Ireland is at the tip of the Dingle Peninsula in the ancient parishes of Corca Dhuibhne. For todays walk we will make our way west of Dingle, out to the village of Ventry/Dun Chaoin. We will follow the rough track up to the top of Mount Eagle and from here we will follow the ridge and drop down to Slea Head. We will then walk by road to Coumeenole beach which was used in the movie Ryan’s Daughter. We will then walk back to Dun Chaoin where we will be picked up and brought back to Dingle.


Day 3: Sunday:

Trip: Blasket Islands (Habitat - Island)
Route: Blasket Islands. An island walk has a unique charm- that feeling of being far removed from the outside world and the toil of your daily existence. Today we will travel out to Dun Chaoin where we will embark on a 20 minute boat ride that will take us to the larger of the Blasket Islands: the Great Blasket. This is a delightful circular walk around the steep cliff rimmed and heather clad hills of this most westerly of mountainous islands. When we finish our walk you can relax and enjoy one of Ireland’s scenic beaches.


Day 4: Monday:

Trip: Ballydavid Head Coastal Walks (Habitat - Coastal Cliffs)
Route: Feohanagh- Coastline Cliffs- Beenmore- Feohanagh. The rocks of Kerry are as old as life itself, and where better to start to discover it than at the beginning - where the volcanic rocks formed more than 400 million years ago and now form the path solidly beneath your feet as you walk along the tip of the Dingle peninsula. On this walk we will begin in the small village of Feohanagh, 7 miles from Dingle and under the shadow of Mt Brandon. (Ireland's 2nd largest peak) This is a moderate circular walk that follows an ill-defined path along the coastline cliffs. We will climb up to the top of the headland, and along to one of the old watchtowers used during the war. The views from along the cliffs are quiet spectacular. We will finish at the peak of Beenmore and make our way back to Feohanagh.


Day 5: Tuesday:

Trip: Dingle to Slea Head (Habitat - Coastal)
Route: The Kerry Way - Dingle - Ventry Beach - Slea Head. This is a varied walk of hill, beach, and track following the Kerry way. We begin just outside Dingle town, following track and road to the top of Ventry Beach. Across to Slea Head, skirting the side of Mount Eagle. We finish at Slea Head.


Day 6: Wednesday:

Trip: Anascaul (Habitat - Mountain Peaks)
Route: Anascaul - Lake and Mountain Track. This walk begins in the village of Anascaul, the birth place of the renowned Artic Explorer, Tom Crean. We will proceed up to Anascaul lake, lying north of the
village. This is a moderate climb up a fine old green road. We will complete this circular walk around the mountain top and back down to the lake.


Day 7: Thursday:

Departure for home. Additional Options: Cloghan/Brandon, Com A Lochaigh, a great example of glaciating and The Maharees, a area of great coastal dunes walks.

Special note:
Due to the nature of Irish weather our walking holidays will have a number of options that we can alter depending on the condition.
If we are going to an island we will be able to alter our walking days to pick the best time to take advantage of sea conditions. We will also be able to alter high level walks to coastal walks depending on conditions on the hills.

Walking boots, warm layering system, Wind/rain proof jacket and pants, warm hat and gloves, small day bag to carry rain gear. If you are going on a hike for more than 4 hours, we recommend that you carry a packed lunch and plenty of water. We can organise this for you for an additional fee.

First Aid Kit: We suggest bringing a small personal first aid kit.

 

 

Monday, 28 June 2010 17:36
Published in Corporate News

Pat Falvey was a guest speaker at the launch of the new discovery series of maps for Ireland brought out by the Ordinance Survey of Ireland.

Covering the whole island of Ireland, the series includes 92 individual maps and are specifically designed for tourist and leisure activities. Seventy-five are published by Ordinance Survey Ireland and seventeen by Ordinance Survey Northern Ireland.

Pat Falvey, gave a 60 minute inspirational pre-lunch talk entitled ‘From Carrantuohill to Everest.’ He underlined how important accurate and high quality mapping is to ensure safe navigation in wilderness areas. Pat spoke to a packed audience of groups and associations representing outdoor pursuits, including the Irish Mountain Rescue Association, the Irish Ramblers Club, the Walkers Association of Ireland, Scouting Ireland, Failte Ireland, and the National Parks & Wildlife Service as well as many corporate companies from the public and private sector.

Also speaking at the launch, Minister Hanafin said: “I am delighted that Ordnance Survey Ireland produces these superb maps – both for our tourists and for the general public. The Discovery Series reflects the rich natural heritage we have in Ireland. I would encourage everyone to use these maps to explore our unique and world renowned landscape.”

Ms Geraldine Ruane, Chief Executive of OSI said: “We wanted to ensure that our Discovery Series included every feature and detail that these organisations would need in our maps. Our commitment to quality and accuracy is regarded as a benchmark by all mapping agencies in the world. The Discovery Series is our most popular map series and we are always pleased with the fantastic feedback we receive from our customers. Failte Ireland and Tourism Ireland tell us that the Discovery Series plays an important role in attracting tourists to visit Ireland”.

At the launch, OSI also showcased their extensive range of digital mapping technology which is available to a wide range of Corporate, Government and SME customers. Details of OSI mapping technology can be seen on the OSI website at  www.osi.ie.

 

For more information on Pat - contact us here at www.patfalvey.com

 

Monday, 28 June 2010 16:45

Moving Mountains - Carrauntoohil 3414 feet- With Teena Gates 98 fm Also listen to podcast Moving Mountains

Pushing over the top of the ridge I gasped in surprise "you kept this a secret" as the grey slatted rocks that I'd been climbing up like stairs fell away to a ridge that slipped over the edge of the world - with green and grey and golden waves rolling off into the clouds below to crash on rocks as old as the world itself.

Arriving at the Mountain Lodge of adventurer Pat Falvey, I wear my enthusiasm for the climb ahead like a badge, or a sheet of armour; as quaking in my climbing boots I wonder whether I can really make it to the top of Carrauntoohil, 3,500 feet and Ireland's highest mountain. I dread the thought of slowing down the group going out. Was walking in the Wicklow hills enough preparation, or will I be hopelessly outpaced, and mortified in front of strangers? Listening carefully to the briefing, I spot the change of tone as the larger than life Pat switches gear from wise-cracks and fun, to sober comment, host turned leader, as he talks about the need to keep up when push comes to shove. There are only so many hours of daylight to climb a mountain. Another snatched, silent conversation with myself and what now seems like the lunacy of being here; I breathe deeply, commit myself, and we're off.

Walking past the memorials in the carpark at the foot of Carrauntoohil, I'm reminded that we're approaching a sleeping giant sweeping calmly up in front, glowing green and purple, serene in the sun but ready with a fickle flick to change the odds in a heartbeat. Crossing the first of a number of bridges on the way up, our guides explain about flash floods that came off the mountain snatching the life from one young woman within sight of the very carpark we'd just left. It's sobering, but we push ahead and despite being nervous, my spirits soar as my muscles warm and I break into a light sweat, learning more about the other climbers in the group, and feeling relief as I discover I'm not the only one here for the first time. There is huge reassurance in that, company for the challenge ahead. Approaching the first of 3 lakes, we stop to catch our breath, and catch up on more from the guides about the history and folklore of the hills around us.

Shortly afterwards we came to a halt at what, to me, seemed to be an impenetrable sheet of rock. "3 points of contact - up" announced Pat, and he was up and climbing - no ropes, no carabinos, no clips, no dress-rehearsal... no way. "Are you mad?" I scream silently, as I toy with the thought of running as fast as my walking boots will take me in the opposite direction. Breathing deeply, another silent conversation with myself as I call on my personal mantra for tough times, 'one foot in front of another & breathe'. I focus, find the foothold Pat points to and looking up, the rocks above begin to take on new images of hand-holds and potential grips. Swinging up to my 'three-points of contact' I look again and see and find, and reach and stretch and find my feet. Confidence growing I move again, switching weight, muscles engaging, responding, reacting. My breath deepens and I find a rhythm; I'm 'scrambling' and a smile bursts across my face as I realise I'm loving it.

A couple of hours later, after climbing over rocks, picking through moss and heather, and the trudge of putting 'one foot in front of another' on tired legs, the seasons change again and bright sunshine gives way to biting icy rain and a piercing wind. As the elements kick off, I rip out fleece and coat, and hat and gloves. How quickly a warm body can turn to deathly chill on a mountain, a chilling nudge from the idle giant. Measured breathing and a steady pace allows for conversation with my colleagues, it's nice; they're good people and we exchange tips about breathing and walking and I learn small, subtle things, that make sense on a mountain.

The mist closes in as we close on the summit. The light is creamy, silver and unusual. With the dark rocks below my feet and hands, and the rain dripping from my nose and hair and stinging my eyes, I feel like I'm walking in a plastic bubble, that I can reach up and punch through to the daylight outside. Conscious again of the flow of my breath, of keeping a rhythm, of putting one foot in front of another. Then a cross looms out of the mist and the wind whips my face, as I recognise the scene from photos poured over in recent days. We've made it, I've made it.

Standing at the top, hugging, laughing sharing smiles and joy with other climbers coming over the edge, I'm humbled and proud, conflicted; torn between the contradiction of the power of the mountain beneath me, and the power of the body that brought me to stand on top of the highest peak in Ireland. Without warning the mist clears, I'm bathed in sunlight and a sudden movement pulls my eye down off the peak to the rocks below. Clouds are flying past at speed below me, and I wonder in amazement as I watch, feeling slightly dizzy, as if someone put the world on 'fast forward'.

The descent is tough, weight thrown down on my haunches, but knees and ankles bear up, and nothing can wipe the smile from my face. Buzzing, hooked, knowing it's the start of new adventures and challenges. Carrauntoohil has not seen the last of me, and I have not seen the last of it. In the weeks ahead working in the gym, grappling with the final few minutes on the treadmill, or groaning over floor exercises and stretches, this Kerry mountain will be flashing through my mind, a reward and a promise and a lure to pull the extra mile from the rowing machine. That peak, that feeling of reaching the summit has left Kerry and travels back to Dublin with me on my journey. Today, I have moved mountains.