Camino

  • Overview

  • Highlights

  • Portomarin

  • Sarria

  • Grade

  • Tips & Gear

  • Dates & Prices

Trip: Camino de Santiago

 

Route: Sarria to Santiago or Portomarin to Santiago


Date: May - June - September


Duration: 8 Day/ 7 Nights Land Only


Grade: Walk - Moderate


Price: From €565 per person - Land Only

 

Walk the final stages of the Camino from Sarria or Portomarin. An 8 day trip with a choice of 111kms or 89kms walks over 5 days.

The Camino Santiago, or way of St James is one of the most famous pilgrimage walks in the world. It's history is steeped in a tradition of over a 1,000 years when pilgrims came to visit the final resting place of the Apostle who, legend has it, was buried initially in the year 44AD after his martyrdom by Herod, and whose final resting place was rediscovered early in the 9th century.

To complete the whole journey from beginning to end could see us cover a distance of up to 800km and more, depending on from where you start. However, our challenge will be much more modest as we begin our 5 day walk from either the town of Sarria or Portomarin.

Stay in rural towns and villages, some dating back to the 9th century with remain of Romanesque churches, bridges and early pilgrim hostels. Walk on well maintained tracks and paths through meadowlands and forests of poplars and eucalyptus. Enter the World Heritage City of Santiago and visiting they many historic buildings including the imposing Cathedral which evolved into the magnificent structure it is today over hundreds of years. Enjoy the company of fellow walkers from far and near along the way, or as we relax after each walk.

An 8 day trip with 89km walk over 5 days.

Our walk from Portomarin is similar to that beginning in Sarria, but without "that long day in the middle" and offers a more leisurely journey into Santiago.

Itinerary:

 

  • Day 1: Arrive to Santiago airport for the afternoon. On arrival, we will travel by private bus to the town of Melide (approx 1 hour drive) where we will spend our first night before continuing to Portomarin the following morning to begin our walk. We will have plenty of time to relax in our hotel before meeting up again over dinner and getting to know each other. *Direct flights to Santiago do not commence until May. Earlier trips will arrive at La Coruna, north of Santiago, via Heathrow.

 

  • Day 2: Walk Portomarin to Palas de Rei 22.4km Ascent: 340m The centre piece of Portomarin is the church of San Nicolas which stands in the town square. It was dismantled in the 1950s and reconstructed on higher ground when the original town was flooded to make way for a hydroelectric scheme. We will begin our walk from the church square, and crossing the river over a narrow footbridge will make our way through forest paths and farmland to arrive at our first coffee break (6km) A further 9km will see us stop after a leisurely walk for a bite of lunch before the final 7km stretch to Palas de Rei, our destination for the night.

 

  • Day 3: Walk Palas de Rei to Melide 14km Total Decent: 230m Though Palas de Rei is said to be on the site of the original Roman road between Lugo and Astorga, there are no major remains within its limits. Todays walk is short as we journey the 14km through oak and pine forests along stretches of restored Roman road as we cross from the province of Lugo to La Coruna and on to Melide where we spent our first night on arriving to Spain. And yes, there is a coffee break (after the first 6km) Time to visit the agricultural museum, church and courtyard, and civic offices.

 

  • Day 4: Walk Melide to Arzua 14km Decent: 40m Another short days walk takes us through much the same type of countryside and terrain, although the latter part of our journey sees us walking along quite country roads as we make our way to Arzua. In medieval times, we would have collected a few stones from the quarries in Triacastela on our way to Sarria from the East and brought them to the furnaces at Castaneda, a few miles beyond Melide, where lime was produced for use in the construction of the Cathedral in Santiago. We pass the beautifully restored 15th century hostel at Ribadiso before entering Arzua a couple of miles further on, with its very pleasing town square where, if the weather permits, we can sit with a drink and watch fellow Pilgrims pass by as the locals go about their business.

 

  • Day 5: Walk to Rua 18km Decent: 80m Our second last days walk sees us stroll through mixed countryside of pine and eucalyptus forest paths, wide open spaces and country roads. Watching the markers along the way, we can count down the distance yet to travel to Santiago, and very shortly we will be on the right side of 20kms. We will stop for a late lunch at a busy roadside café, and from there, its only a 40 minute walk or so to our hotel, our final resting place before entering Santiago the following day.

 

  • Day 6: Walk Rua to Santiago 19km Ascent: 100m Whether you started from Portomarin, from Sarria or from further East, this is a significant day on your journey along the pilgrims route to Santiago. The city is large, and this is reflected in the change of terrain as we approach the suburbs of our final destination. We pass through Labacolla where tradition has it that pilgrims washed themselves before entering the city. We come to Monte de Gozo, or Mound of Joy and then begin our final 5km walk into the city finally arriving at Praza do Obradoiro on which stands the Cathedral. This evening is free time to explore the city and its hospitality at leisure.

 

  • Day 7: Santiago Free Day to explore the city The luxury this morning is that we don't have to pack our bag and have them ready for collection! One of the highlights will be to go, along with pilgrims, walkers and visitors alike to the Cathedral for the mid-day Mass, after which, hopefully, will culminate in the swinging of the giant Botafumeiro. There is an endless list of historical buildings and sights to see, and parks to visit for a quiet moment for yourself after the journey. We will have one final meal together before heading for the airport (Flights arrive afternoon on Day 8)

Sometimes it is necessary to alter the location of the overnight stay There will be notes on the history and traditions of places of interest along the way.


An 8 day trip with 111km walk over 5 days.

 

Itinerary:

 

  • Day 1: Arrive Santiago airport for the afternoon. We travel by private bus to the town of Sarria (approx 2hr) where we spend our first night before beginning the walk next day. We will have plenty of time to relax in our hotel before meeting up for dinner at a riverside cafe 5 minutes walk from the hotel. Here you will receive your Pilgrims Passport which you will get stamped along the Camino and present at the Cathedral office at the end of your journey to receive your Compostla, or Certificate. *Direct flights to Santiago do not commence until May. Earlier trips will arrive at La Coruna, north of Santiago, via Heathrow.

 

  • Day 2: Walk Sarria to Portomarin 23kms Ascent: 220m We begin our walk at 08:30 from Sarria ''of deep routed historical and Jacobean tradition'' through the narrow streets which lead to the outskirts and over the remains of an original Roman bridge before passing under a massive newly constructed highway. This is a lovely days walk through wide open spaces, quite country roads and forests alike, punctuated after 6kms by our first coffee stop of the day. Another 7kms brings us to Ferreiros, a little hamlet of just a few buildings and where we have a lunch break before the last stretch into Portomarin (a further 9kms).

 

  • Day 3: Walk Portomarin to Palas de Rei 22kms Total Ascent: 340m The centre piece of Portomarin is the church of San Nicolas which stands in the town square. It was dismantled in the 1950s and reconstructed on higher ground when the original town was flooded to make way for a hydroelectric scheme. We will begin our walk from the church square, and crossing the river over a narrow footbridge will make our way through forest paths and farmland to arrive at our first coffee break (6km) A further 9km will see us stop after a leisurely walk for a bite of lunch before the final 7km stretch to Palas de Rei, our destination for the night.

 

  • Day 4: Walk Palas de Rei to Arzua 27kms This is a long walk, esp after the previous 2 days of over 20kms each (It is now you will be glad you got in some long distance walks at home over the last couple of months) Through Palas de Rei is said to be on the site of the original Roman road between Lugo and Astorga, there are no major remains within its limits. Today sees us walk through oak and pine forests as we cross from the province of Lugo to La Coruna. A coffee break after the usual 6kms or so, and then a lunch stop at Melide before heading on for Arzua, just under 14kms along the Camino. In medival times, we would have collected a few stones from the quarries in Triacastela on our way to Sarria from the east and brought them to the furnaces at Castaneda a few miles beyond Melide where lime was produced for use in the construction of the Cathedral in Santiago. We will walk into Arzua and stop for a well earned drink in the town square waiting for our bus to bring us back to Melide where we will stay the night.

 

  • Day 5: Walk Arzua to Rua 18kms Decent: 40m Our bus will collect us in the morning and drop us off again in Arzua, where our second last days walk sees us stroll through mixed countryside of pine and eucalyptus forest paths, wide open spaces and quiet country roads. Watching the markers along the way, we can count down the distance yet to travel to Santiago, and very shortly we will be on the right side of 20kms. We will stop for a late lunch at a busy roadside cafe and from there, it is only a 40 minute walk to our hotel- our final resting place before entering Santiago the following day.

 

  • Day 6: Walk Rua to Santiago 19km Ascent: 100m Whether you started from Portomarin, from Sarria or from further East, this is a significant day on your journey along the pilgrims route to Santiago. The city is large, and this is reflected in the change of terrain as we approach the suburbs of our final destination. We pass through Labacolla where tradition has it that pilgrims washed themselves before entering the city. We come to Monte de Gozo, or Mound of Joy and then begin our final 5km walk into the city finally arriving at Praza do Obradoiro on which stands the Cathedral. This evening is free time to explore the city and its hospitality at leisure.

 

  • Day 7: Santiago Free day to explore the city. The luxury this morning is that we don't have to pack our bag and have them ready for collection! One of the highlights will be to go, along with pilgrims, walkers and visitors alike to the Cathedral for the mid-day Mass, after which, hopefully, will culminate in the swinging of the giant Botafumeiro. If you listen carefully before the actual mass begins, you will hear 'Grupo Irlanda' being called out from the alter as each group of walkers who completed the minimum distance from Sarria is acknowledged. You will have presented yourselves along with completed cards at the nearby Pilgrims office the evening before and collected your certificate. There is an endless list of historical buildings and sights to see, and parks to visit for a quiet moment for yourself after the journey. We will have one final meal together before heading for the airport (Flights arrive afternoon on Day 8)

 

Sometimes it is necessary to alter the location of the overnight stay. There will be notes on the history and traditions of places of interest along the way.

Grade: Walk: Moderate

 

These are primarily walking holidays and require a reasonable level of fitness in order to get the most enjoyment from your week on the Camino. There is expert advice on hand to talk to you about the best footwear, clothing, etc for your walk.

  • Choose your walking shoes or light boots carefully. They should be designed for support, comfort and grip. Most blisters are as a result of poorly fitting socks of dubious quality.
  • Set out a training programme for yourself. Get used to walking continuously for four hours or so once a week. Speed or distance isn't important at the beginning, just keep moving at a steady pace and build up to longer walks over varying terrain. Use a walking pole if you feel it gives you support over rough ground. Choose one which folds easily and fits into your luggage case when travelling. Spend time choosing your rucksack, and beware of features that you don't need. A 45 litre capacity is ideal for a couple of weeks walking carrying your own gear. A rain cover is essential, although an internal waterproof bag is more effective.


Food and drink: Generally speaking eat what ever you like best, just eat plenty of it. And remember that you're eating today for tomorrow, so a substantial meal late at night is often a good thing for an early start and a long distance. Have a few bars or biscuits for a snack. Keep hydrated, a little and often, and water is best.


Plan tomorrow's walk: Check the map or the route, know the distance, tick off the coffee stops or rest breaks, be aware of steep climbs coming up. Be aware of any history or culture associated with the route and look around you to take in the sights. Carry a basic first aid kit - bandage for sprains, wipes and a selection of plasters for cuts or grazes, blister pads for the feet. If you are taking medication with you make sure that you have enough for the entire stay - and an extra supply in case of delays or emergencies.

 

Prices are per person sharing Land Only. Flights can be arranged for your trip. Trip is from Thursday to Thursday or Saturday to Saturday throughout the summer Contact us 

  • Sarria:  €615 per person

  • Portomarin: €565 per person

 

Price includes:

  • B&B in Hotels along the way (Twin Sharing)

  • Private transfer to/from Airports

  • Luggage transfers to the next Hotel along route

  • Self Guided


Price excludes:

  • Personal items

  • International flights to/from Spain

  • Single Supplements Apply

 

 

 

 

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